Role of circulating immune complexes in human secondary syphilis

J. L. Jorizzo, M. C. McNeely, R. E. Baughn, Alvin Jr Solomon, T. Cavallo, E. B. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Studies in animal models and in the glomerulonephritis of human secondary syphilis and results from in vitro assays have suggested a role for circulating immune complexes (CICs) in human secondary syphilis. Nine adult subjects with early secondary syphilis were studied. All patients tested had CICs on C1q-binding or Raji cell assays. Proteins previously described as Treponema pallidum-specific antigens were detected by radioimmunoblot techniques in CICs from all five subjects tested. Biopsy of early cutaneous lesions revealed immunoreactants (IgG, C3, and/or C1q) in three of nine subjects and treponemal antigen in six of eight subjects tested. Histamine was injected intradermally as a trap for CICs, and biopsy of these injection sites revealed immunoreactants in four of nine subjects and treponemal antigen in five of eight subjects tested. A neutrophilic vascular reaction consistent with CIC-mediated vessel damage was seen in three of nine lesions and six of nine histamine injection sites. Normal controls did not show these changes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1014-1022
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume153
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

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Antigen-Antibody Complex
Antigens
Histamine
Biopsy
Treponema pallidum
Injections
Glomerulonephritis
Blood Vessels
Animal Models
Immunoglobulin G
Secondary syphilis
Skin
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Jorizzo, J. L., McNeely, M. C., Baughn, R. E., Solomon, A. J., Cavallo, T., & Smith, E. B. (1986). Role of circulating immune complexes in human secondary syphilis. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 153(6), 1014-1022.

Role of circulating immune complexes in human secondary syphilis. / Jorizzo, J. L.; McNeely, M. C.; Baughn, R. E.; Solomon, Alvin Jr; Cavallo, T.; Smith, E. B.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 153, No. 6, 1986, p. 1014-1022.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jorizzo, JL, McNeely, MC, Baughn, RE, Solomon, AJ, Cavallo, T & Smith, EB 1986, 'Role of circulating immune complexes in human secondary syphilis', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 153, no. 6, pp. 1014-1022.
Jorizzo JL, McNeely MC, Baughn RE, Solomon AJ, Cavallo T, Smith EB. Role of circulating immune complexes in human secondary syphilis. Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1986;153(6):1014-1022.
Jorizzo, J. L. ; McNeely, M. C. ; Baughn, R. E. ; Solomon, Alvin Jr ; Cavallo, T. ; Smith, E. B. / Role of circulating immune complexes in human secondary syphilis. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1986 ; Vol. 153, No. 6. pp. 1014-1022.
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