Risk of stroke or transient ischemic attack after atrial fibrillation ablation with oral anticoagulant use guided by ECG monitoring and pulse assessment

Michael P. Riley, Erica Zado, Mathew D. Hutchinson, David Lin, Rupa Bala, Fermin C. Garcia, David J. Callans, Joshua M. Cooper, Ralph J. Verdino, Sanjay Dixit, Francis E. Marchlinski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oral Anticoagulant Use After AF Ablation Introduction We sought to gain insight into stroke risk after atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. Methods and Results We followed 1,990 patients for >1 year (49 ± 29 months) who underwent AF ablation. Prior to stopping oral anticoagulants (OAC), we performed 3-week transtelephonic ECG monitoring (TTM) and taught patients heart rate and pulse assessment. Documented AF or inability to do monitoring or assess pulse precluded stopping OAC in CHADS2 ≥1 patients. OAC was stopped in 546/840 (65%) with CHADS2 = 0; 384/796 (48%) with CHADS2 = 1 and 101/354 (40%) with CHADS2 ≥ 2. Sixteen strokes or TIAs occurred (0.2%/patient-year); 5 in CHADS2 = 0 patients (all off OAC); 5 in CHADS2 = 1 (1 off and 4 on OAC); and 6 in CHADS2 ≥2 (2 off and 4 on OAC). Twelve of 16 patients (75%) with stroke or TIA had documented AF. In patients "off " OAC, stroke rate/year stratified by the CHADS2 score was similar (CHADS 2 = 0: 0.28%; CHADS2 = 1: 0.07%; CHADS2 ≥2: 0.50%; P = NS). There was no difference in stroke risk "on" versus "off " OAC in CHADS2 = 1 (0.48% vs. 0.07%) or CHADS2 ≥2 (0.39% vs. 0.50%). Risk of major bleeding per patient year "on" OAC was > "off " OAC (13/1,138 (1.14%) versus 1/832 (0.1%); P2 ≥2 patients with low stroke and hemorrhagic risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)591-596
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Transient Ischemic Attack
Anticoagulants
Atrial Fibrillation
Pulse
Electrocardiography
Stroke
Physiologic Monitoring
Heart Rate
Hemorrhage

Keywords

  • atrial fibrillation
  • catheter ablation
  • CVA
  • oral anticoagulation
  • stroke
  • thromboembolism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Risk of stroke or transient ischemic attack after atrial fibrillation ablation with oral anticoagulant use guided by ECG monitoring and pulse assessment. / Riley, Michael P.; Zado, Erica; Hutchinson, Mathew D.; Lin, David; Bala, Rupa; Garcia, Fermin C.; Callans, David J.; Cooper, Joshua M.; Verdino, Ralph J.; Dixit, Sanjay; Marchlinski, Francis E.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology, Vol. 25, No. 6, 2014, p. 591-596.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Riley, MP, Zado, E, Hutchinson, MD, Lin, D, Bala, R, Garcia, FC, Callans, DJ, Cooper, JM, Verdino, RJ, Dixit, S & Marchlinski, FE 2014, 'Risk of stroke or transient ischemic attack after atrial fibrillation ablation with oral anticoagulant use guided by ECG monitoring and pulse assessment', Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology, vol. 25, no. 6, pp. 591-596. https://doi.org/10.1111/jce.12387
Riley, Michael P. ; Zado, Erica ; Hutchinson, Mathew D. ; Lin, David ; Bala, Rupa ; Garcia, Fermin C. ; Callans, David J. ; Cooper, Joshua M. ; Verdino, Ralph J. ; Dixit, Sanjay ; Marchlinski, Francis E. / Risk of stroke or transient ischemic attack after atrial fibrillation ablation with oral anticoagulant use guided by ECG monitoring and pulse assessment. In: Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology. 2014 ; Vol. 25, No. 6. pp. 591-596.
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