Revolving doors: Imprisonment among the homeless and marginally housed population

Margot B. Kushel, Judith A. Hahn, Jennifer L. Evans, David Bangsberg, Andrew R. Moss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

134 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. We studied a sample of homeless and marginally housed adults to examine whether a history of imprisonment was associated with differences in health status, drug use, and sexual behaviors among the homeless. Methods. We interviewed 1426 community-based homeless and marginally housed adults. We used multivariate models to analyze factors associated with a history of imprisonment. Results. Almost one fourth of participants (23.1%) had a history of imprisonment. Models that examined lifetime substance use showed cocaine use (odds ratio [OR] = 1.67; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.04, 2.70), heroin use (OR =1.51; 95% CI = 1.07, 2.12), mental illness (OR = 1.41; 95% CI = 1.01, 1.96), HIV infection (OR = 1.69; 95% CI = 1.07, 2.64), and having had more than 100 sexual partners were associated with a history of imprisonment. Models that examined recent substance use showed past-year heroin use (OR = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.14, 2.38) and methamphetamine use (OR = 1.49; 95% CI = 1.00, 2.21) were associated with lifetime imprisonment. Currently selling drugs also was associated with lifetime imprisonment. Conclusions. Despite high levels of health risks among all homeless and marginally housed people, the levels among homeless former prisoners were even higher. Efforts to eradicate homelessness also must include the unmet needs of inmates who are released from prison.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1747-1752
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume95
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Population
Heroin
Health Status
Homeless Persons
Prisoners
Methamphetamine
Prisons
Sexual Partners
Cocaine
Sexual Behavior
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Statistical Factor Analysis
HIV Infections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Revolving doors : Imprisonment among the homeless and marginally housed population. / Kushel, Margot B.; Hahn, Judith A.; Evans, Jennifer L.; Bangsberg, David; Moss, Andrew R.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 95, No. 10, 10.2005, p. 1747-1752.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kushel, Margot B. ; Hahn, Judith A. ; Evans, Jennifer L. ; Bangsberg, David ; Moss, Andrew R. / Revolving doors : Imprisonment among the homeless and marginally housed population. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2005 ; Vol. 95, No. 10. pp. 1747-1752.
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