Revision Risk for Total Knee Arthroplasty Polyethylene Designs in Patients 65 Years of Age or Older: An Analysis from the American Joint Replacement Registry

Jamil Kendall, Christopher E. Pelt, Benjamin Imlay, Patrick Yep, Kyle Mullen, Ryland Kagan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background:Polyethylene bearing design may influence the risk of revision after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Previous investigations from outside of the United States have suggested the potential for an increased risk of all-cause revision and revision for infection with the use of posterior-stabilized bearings. We examine the risk of revision based on the polyethylene bearing design selection for primary TKA.Methods:An analysis of the American Joint Replacement Registry (AJRR) data from 2012 to 2019 was performed. We identified all primary TKAs over the study period and linked cases to supplemental U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) data where available. Patient demographic characteristics, polyethylene characteristics, procedure dates, and cause for revision were recorded. Analysis was performed to compare minimally stabilized implants (cruciate-retaining, anterior-stabilized, or pivot bearing designs) with posterior-stabilized implants. Cumulative incidence function (CIF) curves and Cox proportional hazard ratios (HRs) were created for all-cause revision and revision for infection in each group.Results:We identified 305,279 cases with reported minimally stabilized or posterior-stabilized implant characteristics. There were 161,486 cases (52.9%) that utilized posterior-stabilized bearings compared with 143,793 cases (47.1%) with minimally stabilized bearings. For minimally stabilized bearings, 1,693 cases (1.18%) had all-cause revision and 334 cases (0.23%) had revision for infection. For posterior-stabilized bearings, 2,406 cases (1.49%) had all-cause revision and 446 cases (0.28%) had revision for infection. The use of posterior-stabilized bearings had HRs of 1.25 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2 to 1.3; p < 0.0001) for all-cause revision and 1.18 (95% CI, 1.0 to 1.4; p = 0.02) for revision for infection.Conclusions:Similar to investigations from international registries, we found an increased risk of all-cause revision and revision for infection when using posterior-stabilized bearings in TKA in the United States. Surgeons should consider this finding when considering bearing selection for primary TKA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1548-1553
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery - American Volume
Volume104
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 7 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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