Reversal of electrical remodeling after cardioversion of persistent atrial fibrillation

Merritt H. Raitt, Walter Kusumoto, George Giraud, John H. Mcanulty

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    63 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Introduction: In animals, atrial fibrillation results in reversible atrial electrical remodeling manifested as shortening of the atrial effective refractory period, slowing of intra-atrial conduction, and prolongation of sinus node recovery time. There is limited information on changes in these parameters after cardioversion in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation. Methods and Results: Thirty-eight patients who had been in atrial fibrillation for 1 to 12 months underwent electrophysiologic testing 10 minutes and 1 hour after cardioversion. At 1 week, 19 patients still in sinus rhythm returned for repeat testing. Reverse remodeling of the effective refractory period was not uniform across the three atrial sites tested. At the lateral right atrium, there was a highly significant increase in the effective refractory period between 10 minutes and 1 hour after cardioversion (drive cycle length 400 ms: 204 ± 17 ms vs 211 ± 20 ms, drive cycle length 550 ms: 213 ± 18 ms vs 219 ± 23 ms, P <0.001). The effective refractory period at the coronary sinus and distal coronary sinus did not change in the first hour but had increased by 1 week. The corrected sinus node recovery time did not change in the first hour but was shorter at 1 week (606 ± 311 ms vs 408 ± 160 ms, P = 0.009). P wave duration also was shorter at 1 week (135 ± 18 ms vs 129 ± 13 ms, P = 0.04) consistent with increasing atrial conduction velocity. Conclusion: The atrial effective refractory period increases, sinus node function improves, and atrial conduction velocity goes up in the first week after cardioversion of long-standing atrial fibrillation in humans. Reverse electrical remodeling of the effective refractory period occurs at different rates in different regions of the atrium.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)507-512
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology
    Volume15
    Issue number5
    StatePublished - May 2004

    Fingerprint

    Atrial Remodeling
    Electric Countershock
    Atrial Fibrillation
    Sinoatrial Node
    Coronary Sinus
    Atrial Function
    Heart Atria

    Keywords

    • Atrial fibrillation
    • Cardioversion
    • Conduction velocity
    • Refractory period
    • Signal averaging

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
    • Physiology

    Cite this

    Reversal of electrical remodeling after cardioversion of persistent atrial fibrillation. / Raitt, Merritt H.; Kusumoto, Walter; Giraud, George; Mcanulty, John H.

    In: Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology, Vol. 15, No. 5, 05.2004, p. 507-512.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Raitt, Merritt H. ; Kusumoto, Walter ; Giraud, George ; Mcanulty, John H. / Reversal of electrical remodeling after cardioversion of persistent atrial fibrillation. In: Journal of Cardiovascular Electrophysiology. 2004 ; Vol. 15, No. 5. pp. 507-512.
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