Retinal pigment epithelial cells produce interleukin-1β and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in response to interleukin-1α

Stephen Planck, Xiao Na Huang, Joseph Robertson, James (Jim) Rosenbaum

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54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is clinically involved in diverse ocular inflammatory diseases. Because perturbed RPE cells produce a variety of inflammatory substances, RPE cells may play an integral part in these diseases. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are pleiotropic cytokines with the ability to trigger numerous inflammatory responses. This report shows that cultured human RPE cells synthesize interleukin-1 β (IL-1β) and GM-CSF in response to the potentially inflammatory cytokine, IL-1α but not to E. coli endotoxin. Control RPE cells made little or no mRNA or protein for either IL-1β or GM-CSF. Upon stimulation of the cells by IL-1α both IL-1β and GM-CSF mRNAs were readily apparent by 3 hours, persisted for over 24 hours, and were translated into immunologically detectable proteins. GM-CSF protein was secreted into the culture medium, whereas IL-1β protein remained cell associated. The IL-1αinduced mRNA and protein production were inhibited by dexamethasone. These observations provide additional evidence that RPE cells are capable of playing a pivotal role during ocular inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-212
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Eye Research
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

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Retinal Pigments
Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Retinal Pigment Epithelium
Interleukin-1
Epithelial Cells
Proteins
Messenger RNA
Cytokines
Eye Diseases
Endotoxins
Dexamethasone
Culture Media
Escherichia coli
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

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title = "Retinal pigment epithelial cells produce interleukin-1β and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in response to interleukin-1α",
abstract = "The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is clinically involved in diverse ocular inflammatory diseases. Because perturbed RPE cells produce a variety of inflammatory substances, RPE cells may play an integral part in these diseases. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are pleiotropic cytokines with the ability to trigger numerous inflammatory responses. This report shows that cultured human RPE cells synthesize interleukin-1 β (IL-1β) and GM-CSF in response to the potentially inflammatory cytokine, IL-1α but not to E. coli endotoxin. Control RPE cells made little or no mRNA or protein for either IL-1β or GM-CSF. Upon stimulation of the cells by IL-1α both IL-1β and GM-CSF mRNAs were readily apparent by 3 hours, persisted for over 24 hours, and were translated into immunologically detectable proteins. GM-CSF protein was secreted into the culture medium, whereas IL-1β protein remained cell associated. The IL-1αinduced mRNA and protein production were inhibited by dexamethasone. These observations provide additional evidence that RPE cells are capable of playing a pivotal role during ocular inflammation.",
author = "Stephen Planck and Huang, {Xiao Na} and Joseph Robertson and Rosenbaum, {James (Jim)}",
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T1 - Retinal pigment epithelial cells produce interleukin-1β and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in response to interleukin-1α

AU - Planck, Stephen

AU - Huang, Xiao Na

AU - Robertson, Joseph

AU - Rosenbaum, James (Jim)

PY - 1993

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N2 - The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is clinically involved in diverse ocular inflammatory diseases. Because perturbed RPE cells produce a variety of inflammatory substances, RPE cells may play an integral part in these diseases. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are pleiotropic cytokines with the ability to trigger numerous inflammatory responses. This report shows that cultured human RPE cells synthesize interleukin-1 β (IL-1β) and GM-CSF in response to the potentially inflammatory cytokine, IL-1α but not to E. coli endotoxin. Control RPE cells made little or no mRNA or protein for either IL-1β or GM-CSF. Upon stimulation of the cells by IL-1α both IL-1β and GM-CSF mRNAs were readily apparent by 3 hours, persisted for over 24 hours, and were translated into immunologically detectable proteins. GM-CSF protein was secreted into the culture medium, whereas IL-1β protein remained cell associated. The IL-1αinduced mRNA and protein production were inhibited by dexamethasone. These observations provide additional evidence that RPE cells are capable of playing a pivotal role during ocular inflammation.

AB - The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is clinically involved in diverse ocular inflammatory diseases. Because perturbed RPE cells produce a variety of inflammatory substances, RPE cells may play an integral part in these diseases. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are pleiotropic cytokines with the ability to trigger numerous inflammatory responses. This report shows that cultured human RPE cells synthesize interleukin-1 β (IL-1β) and GM-CSF in response to the potentially inflammatory cytokine, IL-1α but not to E. coli endotoxin. Control RPE cells made little or no mRNA or protein for either IL-1β or GM-CSF. Upon stimulation of the cells by IL-1α both IL-1β and GM-CSF mRNAs were readily apparent by 3 hours, persisted for over 24 hours, and were translated into immunologically detectable proteins. GM-CSF protein was secreted into the culture medium, whereas IL-1β protein remained cell associated. The IL-1αinduced mRNA and protein production were inhibited by dexamethasone. These observations provide additional evidence that RPE cells are capable of playing a pivotal role during ocular inflammation.

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