Restraint stress alters neutrophil and macrophage phenotypes during wound healing

Stéphanie D. Tymen, Isolde G. Rojas, Xiaofeng Zhou, Zong Juan Fang, Yan Zhao, Phillip Marucha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous studies reported that stress delays wound healing, impairs bacterial clearance, and elevates the risk for opportunistic infection. Neutrophils and macrophages are responsible for the removal of bacteria present at the wound site. The appropriate recruitment and functions of these cells are necessary for efficient bacterial clearance. In our current study we found that restraint stress induced an excessive recruitment of neutrophils extending the inflammatory phase of healing, and the gene expression of neutrophil attracting chemokines MIP-2 and KC. However, restraint stress did not affect macrophage infiltration. Stress decreased the phagocytic abilities of phagocytic cells ex vivo, yet it did not affect superoxide production. The cell surface expression of adhesion molecules CD11b and TLR4 were decreased in peripheral blood monocytes in stressed mice. The phenotype of macrophages present at the wound site was also altered. Gene expression of markers of pro-inflammatory classically activated macrophages, CXCL10 and CCL5, were down-regulated; as were markers associated with wound healing macrophages, CCL22, IGF-1, RELMα; and the regulatory macrophage marker, chemokine CCL1. Restraint stress also induced up-regulation of IL10 gene expression. In summary, our study has shown that restraint stress suppresses the phenotype shift of the macrophage population, as compared to the changes observed during normal wound healing, while the number of macrophages remains constant. We also observed a general suppression of chemokine gene expression. Modulation of the macrophage phenotype could provide a new therapeutic approach in the treatment of wounds under stress conditions in the clinical setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-217
Number of pages11
JournalBrain, Behavior, and Immunity
Volume28
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Wound Healing
Neutrophils
Macrophages
Phenotype
Gene Expression
Chemokine CCL1
Wounds and Injuries
Chemokine CXCL2
Neutrophil Infiltration
Opportunistic Infections
Gene Expression Regulation
Phagocytes
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Chemokines
Superoxides
Interleukin-10
Monocytes
Up-Regulation
Bacteria
Population

Keywords

  • Chemokine
  • Macrophage activation
  • Neutrophil
  • Phagocytosis
  • Restraint stress
  • Wound healing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems

Cite this

Restraint stress alters neutrophil and macrophage phenotypes during wound healing. / Tymen, Stéphanie D.; Rojas, Isolde G.; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Fang, Zong Juan; Zhao, Yan; Marucha, Phillip.

In: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, Vol. 28, 02.2013, p. 207-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tymen, Stéphanie D. ; Rojas, Isolde G. ; Zhou, Xiaofeng ; Fang, Zong Juan ; Zhao, Yan ; Marucha, Phillip. / Restraint stress alters neutrophil and macrophage phenotypes during wound healing. In: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity. 2013 ; Vol. 28. pp. 207-217.
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