Responding to patient requests for hastened death: Physician aid in dying and the clinical oncologist

Rebecca A. Spence, Charles Blanke, Thomas J. Keating, Lynne P. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Physician aid in dying (PAD) or assisted suicide is becoming legal in more US jurisdictions. Meanwhile, the needs of terminally ill patients with cancer are receiving greater attention, including the integration of palliative care into oncology practice. This article highlights a case vignette of a patient with advanced cancer who requests PAD from her oncologist, as a backdrop to help the practicing oncologist examine his or her moral stance regarding participation in aid in dying. The article concludes by offering a framework within which the practicing oncologist can receive and process a patient's request for PAD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)693-699
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Oncology Practice
Volume13
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Physicians
Assisted Suicide
Terminally Ill
Palliative Care
Neoplasms
Oncologists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Responding to patient requests for hastened death : Physician aid in dying and the clinical oncologist. / Spence, Rebecca A.; Blanke, Charles; Keating, Thomas J.; Taylor, Lynne P.

In: Journal of Oncology Practice, Vol. 13, No. 10, 01.10.2017, p. 693-699.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Spence, Rebecca A. ; Blanke, Charles ; Keating, Thomas J. ; Taylor, Lynne P. / Responding to patient requests for hastened death : Physician aid in dying and the clinical oncologist. In: Journal of Oncology Practice. 2017 ; Vol. 13, No. 10. pp. 693-699.
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