Reproductive decision-making and periconception practices among HIV-positive men and women attending HIV services in Durban, South Africa

Lynn T. Matthews, Tamaryn Crankshaw, Janet Giddy, Angela Kaida, Jennifer A. Smit, Norma C. Ware, David R. Bangsberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

62 Scopus citations

Abstract

Understanding reproductive decisions and periconception behavior among HIV-discordant couples is important for designing risk reduction interventions for couples who choose to conceive. In-depth interviews were conducted to explore reproductive decision-making and periconception practices among HIV-positive women with recent pregnancy (n = 30), and HIV-positive men (n = 20), all reporting partners of negative or unknown HIV-status, and attending HIV services in Durban, South Africa. Transcripts were coded for categories and emergent themes. Participants expressed strong reasons for having children, but rarely knew how to reduce periconception HIV transmission. Pregnancy planning occurred on a spectrum ranging from explicitly intended to explicitly unintended, with many falling in between the two extremes. Male fertility desire and misunderstanding serodiscordance contributed to HIV risk behavior. Participants expressed openness to healthcare worker advice for safer conception and modified risk behavior post-conception, suggesting the feasibility of safer conception interventions which may target both men and women and include serodiscordance counseling and promotion of contraception.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)461-470
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

Keywords

  • Family planning
  • HIV prevention
  • HIV-serodiscordant couples
  • Safer conception
  • South Africa

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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