Replacing Arginine 33 for Alanine in the Hemophore HasA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Causes Closure of the H32 Loop in the Apo-Protein

Ritesh Kumar, Yifei Qi, Hirotoshi Matsumura, Scott Lovell, Huili Yao, Kevin P. Battaile, Wonpil Im, Pierre Moenne-Loccoz, Mario Rivera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous characterization of hemophores from Serratia marcescens (HasAs), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (HasAp), and Yersinia pestis (HasAyp) showed that hemin binds between two loops, where it is axially coordinated by H32 and Y75. The Y75 loop is structurally conserved in all three hemophores and harbors conserved ligand Y75. The other loop contains H32 in HasAs and HasAp, but a noncoordinating Q32 in HasAyp. The H32 loop in apo-HasAs and apo-HasAp is in an open conformation, which places H32 about 30 Å from the hemin-binding site. Hence, hemin binding onto the Y75 loop of HasAs or HasAp triggers a large relocation of the H32 loop from an open- to a closed-loop conformation and enables coordination of the hemin-iron by H32. In comparison, the Q32 loop in apo-HasAyp is in the closed conformation, and hemin binding occurs with minimal reorganization and without coordinative interactions with the Q32 loop. Studies in crystallo and in solution have established that the open H32 loop in apo-HasAp and apo-HasAs is well structured and minimally affected by conformational dynamics. In this study we address the intriguing issue of the stability of the H32 loop in apo-HasAp and how hemin binding triggers its relocation. We address this question with a combination of NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and molecular dynamics simulations and find that R33 is critical to the stability of the open H32 loop. Replacing R33 with A causes the H32 loop in R33A apo-HasAp to adopt a conformation similar to that of holo-HasAp. Finally, stopped-flow absorption and resonance Raman analyses of hemin binding to apo-R33A HasAp indicate that the closed H32 loop slows down the insertion of the heme inside the binding pocket, presumably as it obstructs access to the hydrophobic platform on the Y75 loop, but accelerates the completion of the heme iron coordination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2622-2631
Number of pages10
JournalBiochemistry
Volume55
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - May 10 2016

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Hemin
Alanine
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Arginine
Conformations
Yersinia pestis
Proteins
Relocation
Heme
Iron
X ray crystallography
Ports and harbors
Serratia marcescens
Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy
X Ray Crystallography
Molecular dynamics
Molecular Dynamics Simulation
Binding Sites
Ligands
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Replacing Arginine 33 for Alanine in the Hemophore HasA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Causes Closure of the H32 Loop in the Apo-Protein. / Kumar, Ritesh; Qi, Yifei; Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Lovell, Scott; Yao, Huili; Battaile, Kevin P.; Im, Wonpil; Moenne-Loccoz, Pierre; Rivera, Mario.

In: Biochemistry, Vol. 55, No. 18, 10.05.2016, p. 2622-2631.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kumar, Ritesh ; Qi, Yifei ; Matsumura, Hirotoshi ; Lovell, Scott ; Yao, Huili ; Battaile, Kevin P. ; Im, Wonpil ; Moenne-Loccoz, Pierre ; Rivera, Mario. / Replacing Arginine 33 for Alanine in the Hemophore HasA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Causes Closure of the H32 Loop in the Apo-Protein. In: Biochemistry. 2016 ; Vol. 55, No. 18. pp. 2622-2631.
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abstract = "Previous characterization of hemophores from Serratia marcescens (HasAs), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (HasAp), and Yersinia pestis (HasAyp) showed that hemin binds between two loops, where it is axially coordinated by H32 and Y75. The Y75 loop is structurally conserved in all three hemophores and harbors conserved ligand Y75. The other loop contains H32 in HasAs and HasAp, but a noncoordinating Q32 in HasAyp. The H32 loop in apo-HasAs and apo-HasAp is in an open conformation, which places H32 about 30 {\AA} from the hemin-binding site. Hence, hemin binding onto the Y75 loop of HasAs or HasAp triggers a large relocation of the H32 loop from an open- to a closed-loop conformation and enables coordination of the hemin-iron by H32. In comparison, the Q32 loop in apo-HasAyp is in the closed conformation, and hemin binding occurs with minimal reorganization and without coordinative interactions with the Q32 loop. Studies in crystallo and in solution have established that the open H32 loop in apo-HasAp and apo-HasAs is well structured and minimally affected by conformational dynamics. In this study we address the intriguing issue of the stability of the H32 loop in apo-HasAp and how hemin binding triggers its relocation. We address this question with a combination of NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and molecular dynamics simulations and find that R33 is critical to the stability of the open H32 loop. Replacing R33 with A causes the H32 loop in R33A apo-HasAp to adopt a conformation similar to that of holo-HasAp. Finally, stopped-flow absorption and resonance Raman analyses of hemin binding to apo-R33A HasAp indicate that the closed H32 loop slows down the insertion of the heme inside the binding pocket, presumably as it obstructs access to the hydrophobic platform on the Y75 loop, but accelerates the completion of the heme iron coordination.",
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T1 - Replacing Arginine 33 for Alanine in the Hemophore HasA from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Causes Closure of the H32 Loop in the Apo-Protein

AU - Kumar, Ritesh

AU - Qi, Yifei

AU - Matsumura, Hirotoshi

AU - Lovell, Scott

AU - Yao, Huili

AU - Battaile, Kevin P.

AU - Im, Wonpil

AU - Moenne-Loccoz, Pierre

AU - Rivera, Mario

PY - 2016/5/10

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N2 - Previous characterization of hemophores from Serratia marcescens (HasAs), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (HasAp), and Yersinia pestis (HasAyp) showed that hemin binds between two loops, where it is axially coordinated by H32 and Y75. The Y75 loop is structurally conserved in all three hemophores and harbors conserved ligand Y75. The other loop contains H32 in HasAs and HasAp, but a noncoordinating Q32 in HasAyp. The H32 loop in apo-HasAs and apo-HasAp is in an open conformation, which places H32 about 30 Å from the hemin-binding site. Hence, hemin binding onto the Y75 loop of HasAs or HasAp triggers a large relocation of the H32 loop from an open- to a closed-loop conformation and enables coordination of the hemin-iron by H32. In comparison, the Q32 loop in apo-HasAyp is in the closed conformation, and hemin binding occurs with minimal reorganization and without coordinative interactions with the Q32 loop. Studies in crystallo and in solution have established that the open H32 loop in apo-HasAp and apo-HasAs is well structured and minimally affected by conformational dynamics. In this study we address the intriguing issue of the stability of the H32 loop in apo-HasAp and how hemin binding triggers its relocation. We address this question with a combination of NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and molecular dynamics simulations and find that R33 is critical to the stability of the open H32 loop. Replacing R33 with A causes the H32 loop in R33A apo-HasAp to adopt a conformation similar to that of holo-HasAp. Finally, stopped-flow absorption and resonance Raman analyses of hemin binding to apo-R33A HasAp indicate that the closed H32 loop slows down the insertion of the heme inside the binding pocket, presumably as it obstructs access to the hydrophobic platform on the Y75 loop, but accelerates the completion of the heme iron coordination.

AB - Previous characterization of hemophores from Serratia marcescens (HasAs), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (HasAp), and Yersinia pestis (HasAyp) showed that hemin binds between two loops, where it is axially coordinated by H32 and Y75. The Y75 loop is structurally conserved in all three hemophores and harbors conserved ligand Y75. The other loop contains H32 in HasAs and HasAp, but a noncoordinating Q32 in HasAyp. The H32 loop in apo-HasAs and apo-HasAp is in an open conformation, which places H32 about 30 Å from the hemin-binding site. Hence, hemin binding onto the Y75 loop of HasAs or HasAp triggers a large relocation of the H32 loop from an open- to a closed-loop conformation and enables coordination of the hemin-iron by H32. In comparison, the Q32 loop in apo-HasAyp is in the closed conformation, and hemin binding occurs with minimal reorganization and without coordinative interactions with the Q32 loop. Studies in crystallo and in solution have established that the open H32 loop in apo-HasAp and apo-HasAs is well structured and minimally affected by conformational dynamics. In this study we address the intriguing issue of the stability of the H32 loop in apo-HasAp and how hemin binding triggers its relocation. We address this question with a combination of NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and molecular dynamics simulations and find that R33 is critical to the stability of the open H32 loop. Replacing R33 with A causes the H32 loop in R33A apo-HasAp to adopt a conformation similar to that of holo-HasAp. Finally, stopped-flow absorption and resonance Raman analyses of hemin binding to apo-R33A HasAp indicate that the closed H32 loop slows down the insertion of the heme inside the binding pocket, presumably as it obstructs access to the hydrophobic platform on the Y75 loop, but accelerates the completion of the heme iron coordination.

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