Renal cell carcinoma in kidney allografts

histologic types, including biphasic papillary carcinoma

Megan Troxell, John P. Higgins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Kidney transplant recipients are at increased risk for malignancy, with about 5% incidence of cancer in native end-stage kidneys. Carcinoma in the renal allograft is far less common. Prior studies have demonstrated a propensity for renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) of papillary subtypes in end-stage kidneys, and perhaps in allograft kidneys, but most allograft studies lack detailed pathologic review and predate the current classification system. We reviewed our experience with renal carcinoma in kidney allografts at 2 academic centers applying the International Society of Urological Pathology classification, informed by immunohistochemistry. The incidence of renal allograft carcinoma was about 0.26% in our population. Of 12 allograft carcinomas, 6 were papillary (50%), 4 were clear cell (33%), 1 was clear cell (tubulo)papillary, and 1 chromophobe. Two of the papillary carcinomas had distinctive biphasic glomeruloid architecture matching the newly named “biphasic squamoid alveolar” pattern and were difficult to classify on core biopsies. The 2 cell types had different immunophenotypes in our hands (eosinophilic cells: RCC−/CK34betaE12+ weight keratin +/cyclin D1+; clear cells: RCC+/cytokeratin high molecular weight negative to weak/cyclin D1−). None of the patients experienced cancer recurrences or metastasis. Our study confirms the predilection for papillary RCCs in kidney allografts and highlights the occurrence of rare morphologic variants. Larger studies are needed with careful pathologic review, which has been lacking in the literature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-36
Number of pages9
JournalHuman Pathology
Volume57
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

Fingerprint

Papillary Carcinoma
Renal Cell Carcinoma
Allografts
Kidney
Carcinoma
Cyclin D1
Keratins
Neoplasms
Incidence
Prednisolone
Molecular Weight
Immunohistochemistry
Pathology
Neoplasm Metastasis
Biopsy
Weights and Measures
Recurrence

Keywords

  • Biphasic squamoid alveolar carcinoma
  • Clear cell (tubulo) papillary carcinoma
  • Papillary renal cell carcinoma
  • Renal allograft
  • Renal cell carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Renal cell carcinoma in kidney allografts : histologic types, including biphasic papillary carcinoma. / Troxell, Megan; Higgins, John P.

In: Human Pathology, Vol. 57, 01.11.2016, p. 28-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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