Remission of Intermediate Uveitis: Incidence and Predictive Factors

Systemic Immunosuppressive Therapy for Eye Diseases (SITE) Research Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To evaluate the incidence of remission among patients with intermediate uveitis; to identify factors potentially predictive of remission.

DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study.

METHODS: Involved eyes of patients with primary noninfectious intermediate uveitis at 4 academic ocular inflammation subspecialty practices, followed sufficiently long to meet the remission outcome definition, were studied retrospectively by standardized chart review data. Remission of intermediate uveitis was defined as a lack of inflammatory activity at ≥2 visits spanning ≥90 days in the absence of any corticosteroid or immunosuppressant medications. Factors potentially predictive of intermediate uveitis remission were evaluated using survival analysis.

RESULTS: Among 849 eyes (of 510 patients) with intermediate uveitis followed over 1934 eye-years, the incidence of intermediate uveitis remission was 8.6/100 eye-years (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.4-10.1). Factors predictive of disease remission included prior pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) (hazard ratio [HR] [vs no PPV] = 2.39; 95% CI, 1.42-4.00), diagnosis of intermediate uveitis within the last year (HR [vs diagnosis >5 years ago] =3.82; 95% CI, 1.91-7.63), age ≥45 years (HR [vs age <45 years] = 1.79; 95% CI, 1.03-3.11), female sex (HR = 1.61; 95% CI, 1.04-2.49), and Hispanic race/ethnicity (HR [vs white race] = 2.81; 95% CI, 1.23-6.41). Presence/absence of a systemic inflammatory disease, laterality of uveitis, and smoking status were not associated with differential incidence.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that intermediate uveitis is a chronic disease with an overall low rate of remission. Recently diagnosed patients and older, female, and Hispanic patients were more likely to remit. With regard to management, pars plana vitrectomy was associated with increased probability of remission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)110-117
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume164
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

Fingerprint

Intermediate Uveitis
Incidence
Confidence Intervals
Temazepam
Vitrectomy
Hispanic Americans
Uveitis
Sex Ratio
Immunosuppressive Agents
Survival Analysis
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Smoking
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Systemic Immunosuppressive Therapy for Eye Diseases (SITE) Research Group (2016). Remission of Intermediate Uveitis: Incidence and Predictive Factors. American Journal of Ophthalmology, 164, 110-117. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajo.2015.12.034

Remission of Intermediate Uveitis : Incidence and Predictive Factors. / Systemic Immunosuppressive Therapy for Eye Diseases (SITE) Research Group.

In: American Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 164, 01.04.2016, p. 110-117.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Systemic Immunosuppressive Therapy for Eye Diseases (SITE) Research Group 2016, 'Remission of Intermediate Uveitis: Incidence and Predictive Factors', American Journal of Ophthalmology, vol. 164, pp. 110-117. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajo.2015.12.034
Systemic Immunosuppressive Therapy for Eye Diseases (SITE) Research Group. Remission of Intermediate Uveitis: Incidence and Predictive Factors. American Journal of Ophthalmology. 2016 Apr 1;164:110-117. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajo.2015.12.034
Systemic Immunosuppressive Therapy for Eye Diseases (SITE) Research Group. / Remission of Intermediate Uveitis : Incidence and Predictive Factors. In: American Journal of Ophthalmology. 2016 ; Vol. 164. pp. 110-117.
@article{cd7bb42f8abf4f249a9a87fe7bc73edf,
title = "Remission of Intermediate Uveitis: Incidence and Predictive Factors",
abstract = "PURPOSE: To evaluate the incidence of remission among patients with intermediate uveitis; to identify factors potentially predictive of remission.DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study.METHODS: Involved eyes of patients with primary noninfectious intermediate uveitis at 4 academic ocular inflammation subspecialty practices, followed sufficiently long to meet the remission outcome definition, were studied retrospectively by standardized chart review data. Remission of intermediate uveitis was defined as a lack of inflammatory activity at ≥2 visits spanning ≥90 days in the absence of any corticosteroid or immunosuppressant medications. Factors potentially predictive of intermediate uveitis remission were evaluated using survival analysis.RESULTS: Among 849 eyes (of 510 patients) with intermediate uveitis followed over 1934 eye-years, the incidence of intermediate uveitis remission was 8.6/100 eye-years (95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 7.4-10.1). Factors predictive of disease remission included prior pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) (hazard ratio [HR] [vs no PPV] = 2.39; 95{\%} CI, 1.42-4.00), diagnosis of intermediate uveitis within the last year (HR [vs diagnosis >5 years ago] =3.82; 95{\%} CI, 1.91-7.63), age ≥45 years (HR [vs age <45 years] = 1.79; 95{\%} CI, 1.03-3.11), female sex (HR = 1.61; 95{\%} CI, 1.04-2.49), and Hispanic race/ethnicity (HR [vs white race] = 2.81; 95{\%} CI, 1.23-6.41). Presence/absence of a systemic inflammatory disease, laterality of uveitis, and smoking status were not associated with differential incidence.CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that intermediate uveitis is a chronic disease with an overall low rate of remission. Recently diagnosed patients and older, female, and Hispanic patients were more likely to remit. With regard to management, pars plana vitrectomy was associated with increased probability of remission.",
author = "{Systemic Immunosuppressive Therapy for Eye Diseases (SITE) Research Group} and Kempen, {John H.} and Gewaily, {Dina Y.} and Newcomb, {Craig W.} and Liesegang, {Teresa L.} and Ka{\cc}maz, {R. Oktay} and Levy-Clarke, {Grace A.} and Nussenblatt, {Robert B.} and Rosenbaum, {James (Jim)} and Sen, {H. Nida} and Eric Suhler and Thorne, {Jennifer E.} and Foster, {C. Stephen} and Jabs, {Douglas A.} and Abhishek Payal and Fitzgerald, {Tonetta D.}",
year = "2016",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ajo.2015.12.034",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "164",
pages = "110--117",
journal = "American Journal of Ophthalmology",
issn = "0002-9394",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Remission of Intermediate Uveitis

T2 - Incidence and Predictive Factors

AU - Systemic Immunosuppressive Therapy for Eye Diseases (SITE) Research Group

AU - Kempen, John H.

AU - Gewaily, Dina Y.

AU - Newcomb, Craig W.

AU - Liesegang, Teresa L.

AU - Kaçmaz, R. Oktay

AU - Levy-Clarke, Grace A.

AU - Nussenblatt, Robert B.

AU - Rosenbaum, James (Jim)

AU - Sen, H. Nida

AU - Suhler, Eric

AU - Thorne, Jennifer E.

AU - Foster, C. Stephen

AU - Jabs, Douglas A.

AU - Payal, Abhishek

AU - Fitzgerald, Tonetta D.

PY - 2016/4/1

Y1 - 2016/4/1

N2 - PURPOSE: To evaluate the incidence of remission among patients with intermediate uveitis; to identify factors potentially predictive of remission.DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study.METHODS: Involved eyes of patients with primary noninfectious intermediate uveitis at 4 academic ocular inflammation subspecialty practices, followed sufficiently long to meet the remission outcome definition, were studied retrospectively by standardized chart review data. Remission of intermediate uveitis was defined as a lack of inflammatory activity at ≥2 visits spanning ≥90 days in the absence of any corticosteroid or immunosuppressant medications. Factors potentially predictive of intermediate uveitis remission were evaluated using survival analysis.RESULTS: Among 849 eyes (of 510 patients) with intermediate uveitis followed over 1934 eye-years, the incidence of intermediate uveitis remission was 8.6/100 eye-years (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.4-10.1). Factors predictive of disease remission included prior pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) (hazard ratio [HR] [vs no PPV] = 2.39; 95% CI, 1.42-4.00), diagnosis of intermediate uveitis within the last year (HR [vs diagnosis >5 years ago] =3.82; 95% CI, 1.91-7.63), age ≥45 years (HR [vs age <45 years] = 1.79; 95% CI, 1.03-3.11), female sex (HR = 1.61; 95% CI, 1.04-2.49), and Hispanic race/ethnicity (HR [vs white race] = 2.81; 95% CI, 1.23-6.41). Presence/absence of a systemic inflammatory disease, laterality of uveitis, and smoking status were not associated with differential incidence.CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that intermediate uveitis is a chronic disease with an overall low rate of remission. Recently diagnosed patients and older, female, and Hispanic patients were more likely to remit. With regard to management, pars plana vitrectomy was associated with increased probability of remission.

AB - PURPOSE: To evaluate the incidence of remission among patients with intermediate uveitis; to identify factors potentially predictive of remission.DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study.METHODS: Involved eyes of patients with primary noninfectious intermediate uveitis at 4 academic ocular inflammation subspecialty practices, followed sufficiently long to meet the remission outcome definition, were studied retrospectively by standardized chart review data. Remission of intermediate uveitis was defined as a lack of inflammatory activity at ≥2 visits spanning ≥90 days in the absence of any corticosteroid or immunosuppressant medications. Factors potentially predictive of intermediate uveitis remission were evaluated using survival analysis.RESULTS: Among 849 eyes (of 510 patients) with intermediate uveitis followed over 1934 eye-years, the incidence of intermediate uveitis remission was 8.6/100 eye-years (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.4-10.1). Factors predictive of disease remission included prior pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) (hazard ratio [HR] [vs no PPV] = 2.39; 95% CI, 1.42-4.00), diagnosis of intermediate uveitis within the last year (HR [vs diagnosis >5 years ago] =3.82; 95% CI, 1.91-7.63), age ≥45 years (HR [vs age <45 years] = 1.79; 95% CI, 1.03-3.11), female sex (HR = 1.61; 95% CI, 1.04-2.49), and Hispanic race/ethnicity (HR [vs white race] = 2.81; 95% CI, 1.23-6.41). Presence/absence of a systemic inflammatory disease, laterality of uveitis, and smoking status were not associated with differential incidence.CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that intermediate uveitis is a chronic disease with an overall low rate of remission. Recently diagnosed patients and older, female, and Hispanic patients were more likely to remit. With regard to management, pars plana vitrectomy was associated with increased probability of remission.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85027949372&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85027949372&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ajo.2015.12.034

DO - 10.1016/j.ajo.2015.12.034

M3 - Article

C2 - 26772874

AN - SCOPUS:85027949372

VL - 164

SP - 110

EP - 117

JO - American Journal of Ophthalmology

JF - American Journal of Ophthalmology

SN - 0002-9394

ER -