Reliability of monosynaptic sensory transmission in brain stem neurons in vitro

Mark W. Doyle, Michael Andresen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

173 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The timing of events within the nervous system is a critical feature of signal processing and integration. In neurotransmission, the synaptic latency, the time between stimulus delivery and appearance of the synaptic event, is generally thought to be directly related to the complexity of that pathway. In horizontal brain stem slices, we examined synaptic latency and its shock-to-shock variability (synaptic jitter) in medial nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) neurons in response to solitary tract (ST) electrical activation. Using a visualized patch recording approach, we activated ST 1-3 mm from the recorded neuron with short trains (50-200 Hz) and measured synaptic currents under voltage clamp. Latencies ranged from 1.5 to 8.6 ms, and jitter values (SD of intraneuronal latency) ranged from 26 to 764 μs (n = 49). Surprisingly, frequency of synaptic failure was not correlated with either latency or jitter (P > 0.147; n = 49). Despite conventional expectations, no clear divisions in latency were found from the earliest arriving excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) to late pharmacologically polysynaptic responses. Shortest latency EPSCs (

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2213-2223
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neurophysiology
Volume85
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2001

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Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials
Brain Stem
Shock
Neurons
Solitary Nucleus
Synaptic Transmission
Nervous System
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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Reliability of monosynaptic sensory transmission in brain stem neurons in vitro. / Doyle, Mark W.; Andresen, Michael.

In: Journal of Neurophysiology, Vol. 85, No. 5, 2001, p. 2213-2223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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