Relative impact of smoking and reduced pulmonary function on peptic ulcer risk. A prospective study of Japanese men in Hawaii

G. N. Stemmermann, E. B. Marcus, A (Sonia) Buist, C. J. MacLean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine whether reduced pulmonary function is an independent risk factor for peptic ulcer. Among 5933 Japanese men studied in Hawaii, 243 developed gastric ulcers and 99 developed duodenal ulcers 20 yr after an examination completed in 1968. The examination included measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s and a detailed smoking history. The percent predicted forced expiratory volume was significantly and inversely related to ulcer incidence, but not after adjustment for smoking or among those who had never smoked. Cigarettes were associated with increased ulcer risk in both stomach and duodenum but showed a dose-response in pack years only for gastric ulcer. We conclude that the association of reduced pulmonary function with peptic ulcer in the Japanese in Hawaii is largely attributable to smoking and that smoking is more strongly related to gastric than duodenal ulcer. The especially strong link between cigarettes and gastric ulcer suggests that decreased smoking or synchronous decrease in cigarette tar content may have contributed to the recent unexplained decrease in male gastric ulcer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1419-1424
Number of pages6
JournalGastroenterology
Volume96
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1989

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Stomach Ulcer
Peptic Ulcer
Smoking
Prospective Studies
Lung
Forced Expiratory Volume
Duodenal Ulcer
Tobacco Products
Ulcer
Duodenum
Stomach
History
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

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Relative impact of smoking and reduced pulmonary function on peptic ulcer risk. A prospective study of Japanese men in Hawaii. / Stemmermann, G. N.; Marcus, E. B.; Buist, A (Sonia); MacLean, C. J.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 96, No. 6, 1989, p. 1419-1424.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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