Relationships between tattling, likeability, and social classification: A preliminary investigation of adolescents in residential care

Patrick C. Friman, Douglas W. Woods, Kurt A. Freeman, Rich Gilman, Mary Short, Ann M. McGrath, Michael L. Handwerk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Little research has been published on tattling, even less on its social impact, and we found none directly investigating tattling by adolescents. This study assessed the extent to which tattling, as perceived by peers and caregivers of adolescents in a residential care program, was associated with various dimensions of social status and other behavioral correlates. Eighty-eight adolescent participants rated their housemates on likeability, perceived rates of tattling, and other behavioral descriptors. In addition, caretakers also rated each youth in terms of perceived tattling. On the basis of likeability ratings, participants were classified into one of five categories: popular, average, controversial, neglected, and rejected. Results showed a significant negative correlation between likeability and perceived tattling rates. In addition, youth classified as socially rejected were more likely to be perceived by both their peers and care providers as engaging in high rates of tattling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-348
Number of pages18
JournalBehavior Modification
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2004

Keywords

  • Peer reporting
  • Relational aggression
  • Residential care
  • Social rejection
  • Social skills
  • Tattling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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