Relationship between self-care and health-related quality of life in older adults with moderate to advanced heart failure

Harleah G. Buck, Christopher Lee, Debra K. Moser, Nancy M. Albert, Terry Lennie, Brooke Bentley, Linda Worrall-Carter, Barbara Riegel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Heart failure (HF) patients who follow the treatment regimen and attend to symptoms before they escalate are assumed to have better health-related quality of life (HRQOL) than those with poor self-care, but there are few data available to support or refute this assumption. Objective: The objective of the study was to describe the relationship between HF self-care and HRQOL in older (≥65 years old) adults with moderate to advanced HF. Methods: Self-care was measured using the 3 scales (maintenance, management, and confidence) of the Self-care of Heart Failure Index. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher numbers indicating better self-care. Health-related quality of life was measured with the Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire, a 2-subscale (physical and emotional) instrument. Lower numbers on the Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire indicate better HRQOL. Pearson correlations, independent-samples t-tests, and linear and logistic regression modeling were used in the analysis. Results: In 207 adults (72.9 [SD, 6.3] years), New York Heart Association class III (82%) or IV, significant linear associations were observed between self-care confidence and total (r = -0.211; P = .002), physical (r = -0.189; P = .006), and emotional HRQOL (r = -0.201; P = .004). Patients reporting better (below median) HRQOL had higher confidence scores compared with patients reporting above-median HRQOL scores (58.8 [19.2] vs 52.8 [19.6]; P = .028). Confidence was an independent determinant of total (βs = -3.191; P = .002), physical (βs = -2.346; P = .002), and emotional (βs = -3.182; P = .002) HRQOL controlling for other Self-care of Heart Failure Index scores, age, gender, and New York Heart Association class. Each 1-point increase in confidence was associated with a decrease in the likelihood that patients had worse (above median) HRQOL scores (odds ratio, 0.980 [95% confidence interval, 0.963-0.998]) with the same controls. No significant associations were found between self-care maintenance or management and HRQOL. Conclusions: The degree of individual confidence in HF self-care is related to HRQOL, but self-reports of specific maintenance and management behaviors are not. Interventions that improve self-care confidence may be particularly important in older adults with moderate to advanced HF.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8-15
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Nursing
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

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Self Care
Heart Failure
Quality of Life
Maintenance
Self Report
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • confidence
  • heart failure
  • quality of life
  • self-care
  • self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Relationship between self-care and health-related quality of life in older adults with moderate to advanced heart failure. / Buck, Harleah G.; Lee, Christopher; Moser, Debra K.; Albert, Nancy M.; Lennie, Terry; Bentley, Brooke; Worrall-Carter, Linda; Riegel, Barbara.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 8-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Buck, HG, Lee, C, Moser, DK, Albert, NM, Lennie, T, Bentley, B, Worrall-Carter, L & Riegel, B 2012, 'Relationship between self-care and health-related quality of life in older adults with moderate to advanced heart failure', Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 8-15. https://doi.org/10.1097/JCN.0b013e3182106299
Buck, Harleah G. ; Lee, Christopher ; Moser, Debra K. ; Albert, Nancy M. ; Lennie, Terry ; Bentley, Brooke ; Worrall-Carter, Linda ; Riegel, Barbara. / Relationship between self-care and health-related quality of life in older adults with moderate to advanced heart failure. In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing. 2012 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 8-15.
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abstract = "Background: Heart failure (HF) patients who follow the treatment regimen and attend to symptoms before they escalate are assumed to have better health-related quality of life (HRQOL) than those with poor self-care, but there are few data available to support or refute this assumption. Objective: The objective of the study was to describe the relationship between HF self-care and HRQOL in older (≥65 years old) adults with moderate to advanced HF. Methods: Self-care was measured using the 3 scales (maintenance, management, and confidence) of the Self-care of Heart Failure Index. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher numbers indicating better self-care. Health-related quality of life was measured with the Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire, a 2-subscale (physical and emotional) instrument. Lower numbers on the Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire indicate better HRQOL. Pearson correlations, independent-samples t-tests, and linear and logistic regression modeling were used in the analysis. Results: In 207 adults (72.9 [SD, 6.3] years), New York Heart Association class III (82{\%}) or IV, significant linear associations were observed between self-care confidence and total (r = -0.211; P = .002), physical (r = -0.189; P = .006), and emotional HRQOL (r = -0.201; P = .004). Patients reporting better (below median) HRQOL had higher confidence scores compared with patients reporting above-median HRQOL scores (58.8 [19.2] vs 52.8 [19.6]; P = .028). Confidence was an independent determinant of total (βs = -3.191; P = .002), physical (βs = -2.346; P = .002), and emotional (βs = -3.182; P = .002) HRQOL controlling for other Self-care of Heart Failure Index scores, age, gender, and New York Heart Association class. Each 1-point increase in confidence was associated with a decrease in the likelihood that patients had worse (above median) HRQOL scores (odds ratio, 0.980 [95{\%} confidence interval, 0.963-0.998]) with the same controls. No significant associations were found between self-care maintenance or management and HRQOL. Conclusions: The degree of individual confidence in HF self-care is related to HRQOL, but self-reports of specific maintenance and management behaviors are not. Interventions that improve self-care confidence may be particularly important in older adults with moderate to advanced HF.",
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AU - Buck, Harleah G.

AU - Lee, Christopher

AU - Moser, Debra K.

AU - Albert, Nancy M.

AU - Lennie, Terry

AU - Bentley, Brooke

AU - Worrall-Carter, Linda

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N2 - Background: Heart failure (HF) patients who follow the treatment regimen and attend to symptoms before they escalate are assumed to have better health-related quality of life (HRQOL) than those with poor self-care, but there are few data available to support or refute this assumption. Objective: The objective of the study was to describe the relationship between HF self-care and HRQOL in older (≥65 years old) adults with moderate to advanced HF. Methods: Self-care was measured using the 3 scales (maintenance, management, and confidence) of the Self-care of Heart Failure Index. Scores range from 0 to 100, with higher numbers indicating better self-care. Health-related quality of life was measured with the Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire, a 2-subscale (physical and emotional) instrument. Lower numbers on the Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire indicate better HRQOL. Pearson correlations, independent-samples t-tests, and linear and logistic regression modeling were used in the analysis. Results: In 207 adults (72.9 [SD, 6.3] years), New York Heart Association class III (82%) or IV, significant linear associations were observed between self-care confidence and total (r = -0.211; P = .002), physical (r = -0.189; P = .006), and emotional HRQOL (r = -0.201; P = .004). Patients reporting better (below median) HRQOL had higher confidence scores compared with patients reporting above-median HRQOL scores (58.8 [19.2] vs 52.8 [19.6]; P = .028). Confidence was an independent determinant of total (βs = -3.191; P = .002), physical (βs = -2.346; P = .002), and emotional (βs = -3.182; P = .002) HRQOL controlling for other Self-care of Heart Failure Index scores, age, gender, and New York Heart Association class. Each 1-point increase in confidence was associated with a decrease in the likelihood that patients had worse (above median) HRQOL scores (odds ratio, 0.980 [95% confidence interval, 0.963-0.998]) with the same controls. No significant associations were found between self-care maintenance or management and HRQOL. Conclusions: The degree of individual confidence in HF self-care is related to HRQOL, but self-reports of specific maintenance and management behaviors are not. Interventions that improve self-care confidence may be particularly important in older adults with moderate to advanced HF.

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