Relationship between posterior-inferior tibial slope and bilateral noncontact ACL Injury

Steven T. Hendrix, Austin M. Barrett, Bopha Chrea, William H. Replogle, Josie M. Hydrick, Gene R. Barrett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Is there a correlation between increased posterior-inferior tibial slope angle and noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury? Does increasing the posterior-inferior tibial slope angle increase the risk of bilateral ACL injury? A computerized relational database (Access 2007; Microsoft Inc, Redmond, Washington) was used to conduct a retrospective review of patients undergoing bilateral or unilateral ACL reconstruction surgery or treatment by a single surgeon between 1995 and 2013. Included in the study were patients with bilateral and unilateral ACL injuries and patellofemoral pain syndrome with no associated ACL deficiency. Exclusion criteria included concomitant ligament injury, previous ACL reconstruction, and previous knee surgery. Also excluded were patients who did not have plain lateral radiographs. Fifty patients were randomly selected from each group. After controlling for age and Tegner activity level, the authors found that the posterior-inferior tibial slope angle was a significant predictor (P=.002) of noncontact ACL injury. Mean posterior-inferior tibial slope angle for the bilateral, unilateral, and control groups was 11.8°±2.3°, 9.3°±2.4°, and 7.5°±2.3°, respectively. In the group with unilateral ACL injury vs the group without ACL deficiency, a 1° increase in posterior-inferior tibial slope angle (P=.03) was associated with a 20% increase in unilateral ACL injury. In those with bilateral ACL injury vs those without ACL deficiency, a 1° increase in posterior-inferior tibial slope angle (P=.001) increased bilateral knee injury by 34%. The difference between the mean angles of the control group without ACL deficiency and both the bilateral injury and unilateral injury cohorts was statistically significant (P=.003). Increased posterior-inferior tibial slope angle is associated with an increased risk of noncontact bilateral and unilateral ACL injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e136-e140
JournalOrthopedics
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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