Relationship Between Citation-Based Scholarly Activity of United States Radiation Oncology Residents and Subsequent Choice of Academic Versus Private-Practice Career

Shearwood McClelland, Timur Mitin, Lynn D. Wilson, Charles Thomas, Jerry Jaboin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To assess h-index data and their association with radiation oncology resident choice of academic versus private-practice career, using a recent resident graduating class. Methods and Materials: A list of 2016 radiation oncology resident graduates (163 residents from 76 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education–certified programs) and their postresidency career choice (academic vs private practice) was compiled. The Scopus bibliometric citation database was then searched to collect h-index data for each resident. Demographics included in analyses were gender and PhD degree status. Results: Mean h-index score for all resident graduates was 4.15. Residents with a PhD had significantly higher h-index scores (6.75 vs 3.42; P <.01), whereas there was no statistically significant difference in h-index scores between male and female residents (4.38 vs 3.36; P =.06). With regard to career choice, residents choosing academic careers had higher h-index scores than those choosing private practice (5.41 vs 2.96; P <.01). There was no significant difference in mean h-index scores between male and female residents regardless of private-practice (3.15 vs 2.19; P =.25) or academic (5.80 vs 4.30; P =.13) career choice. Conclusions: The average radiation oncology resident graduate published a minimum of 4 manuscripts cited at least 4 times. Graduates with a PhD are significantly more likely to have higher h-index scores, as are residents who choose academic over private-practice careers. There is no significant difference in h-index score between male and female residents, regardless of career choice. These results offer up-to-date benchmarks for evaluating radiation oncology resident productivity and have potential utility in predicting postresidency career choices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-48
Number of pages3
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Volume101
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

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Career Choice
Radiation Oncology
Private Practice
radiation
Bibliometrics
Benchmarking
Manuscripts
Accreditation
Demography
Databases
productivity
lists

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiation
  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

@article{cc45707e12d24c1aabc2937aa54c2de6,
title = "Relationship Between Citation-Based Scholarly Activity of United States Radiation Oncology Residents and Subsequent Choice of Academic Versus Private-Practice Career",
abstract = "Purpose: To assess h-index data and their association with radiation oncology resident choice of academic versus private-practice career, using a recent resident graduating class. Methods and Materials: A list of 2016 radiation oncology resident graduates (163 residents from 76 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education–certified programs) and their postresidency career choice (academic vs private practice) was compiled. The Scopus bibliometric citation database was then searched to collect h-index data for each resident. Demographics included in analyses were gender and PhD degree status. Results: Mean h-index score for all resident graduates was 4.15. Residents with a PhD had significantly higher h-index scores (6.75 vs 3.42; P <.01), whereas there was no statistically significant difference in h-index scores between male and female residents (4.38 vs 3.36; P =.06). With regard to career choice, residents choosing academic careers had higher h-index scores than those choosing private practice (5.41 vs 2.96; P <.01). There was no significant difference in mean h-index scores between male and female residents regardless of private-practice (3.15 vs 2.19; P =.25) or academic (5.80 vs 4.30; P =.13) career choice. Conclusions: The average radiation oncology resident graduate published a minimum of 4 manuscripts cited at least 4 times. Graduates with a PhD are significantly more likely to have higher h-index scores, as are residents who choose academic over private-practice careers. There is no significant difference in h-index score between male and female residents, regardless of career choice. These results offer up-to-date benchmarks for evaluating radiation oncology resident productivity and have potential utility in predicting postresidency career choices.",
author = "Shearwood McClelland and Timur Mitin and Wilson, {Lynn D.} and Charles Thomas and Jerry Jaboin",
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T1 - Relationship Between Citation-Based Scholarly Activity of United States Radiation Oncology Residents and Subsequent Choice of Academic Versus Private-Practice Career

AU - McClelland, Shearwood

AU - Mitin, Timur

AU - Wilson, Lynn D.

AU - Thomas, Charles

AU - Jaboin, Jerry

PY - 2018/5/1

Y1 - 2018/5/1

N2 - Purpose: To assess h-index data and their association with radiation oncology resident choice of academic versus private-practice career, using a recent resident graduating class. Methods and Materials: A list of 2016 radiation oncology resident graduates (163 residents from 76 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education–certified programs) and their postresidency career choice (academic vs private practice) was compiled. The Scopus bibliometric citation database was then searched to collect h-index data for each resident. Demographics included in analyses were gender and PhD degree status. Results: Mean h-index score for all resident graduates was 4.15. Residents with a PhD had significantly higher h-index scores (6.75 vs 3.42; P <.01), whereas there was no statistically significant difference in h-index scores between male and female residents (4.38 vs 3.36; P =.06). With regard to career choice, residents choosing academic careers had higher h-index scores than those choosing private practice (5.41 vs 2.96; P <.01). There was no significant difference in mean h-index scores between male and female residents regardless of private-practice (3.15 vs 2.19; P =.25) or academic (5.80 vs 4.30; P =.13) career choice. Conclusions: The average radiation oncology resident graduate published a minimum of 4 manuscripts cited at least 4 times. Graduates with a PhD are significantly more likely to have higher h-index scores, as are residents who choose academic over private-practice careers. There is no significant difference in h-index score between male and female residents, regardless of career choice. These results offer up-to-date benchmarks for evaluating radiation oncology resident productivity and have potential utility in predicting postresidency career choices.

AB - Purpose: To assess h-index data and their association with radiation oncology resident choice of academic versus private-practice career, using a recent resident graduating class. Methods and Materials: A list of 2016 radiation oncology resident graduates (163 residents from 76 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education–certified programs) and their postresidency career choice (academic vs private practice) was compiled. The Scopus bibliometric citation database was then searched to collect h-index data for each resident. Demographics included in analyses were gender and PhD degree status. Results: Mean h-index score for all resident graduates was 4.15. Residents with a PhD had significantly higher h-index scores (6.75 vs 3.42; P <.01), whereas there was no statistically significant difference in h-index scores between male and female residents (4.38 vs 3.36; P =.06). With regard to career choice, residents choosing academic careers had higher h-index scores than those choosing private practice (5.41 vs 2.96; P <.01). There was no significant difference in mean h-index scores between male and female residents regardless of private-practice (3.15 vs 2.19; P =.25) or academic (5.80 vs 4.30; P =.13) career choice. Conclusions: The average radiation oncology resident graduate published a minimum of 4 manuscripts cited at least 4 times. Graduates with a PhD are significantly more likely to have higher h-index scores, as are residents who choose academic over private-practice careers. There is no significant difference in h-index score between male and female residents, regardless of career choice. These results offer up-to-date benchmarks for evaluating radiation oncology resident productivity and have potential utility in predicting postresidency career choices.

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DO - 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2018.01.093

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JF - International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics

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