Regarding the Inadvisability of Administering Postoperative Analgesics in the Drinking Water of Rats (Rattus norvegicus)

Robert C. Speth, M (Susan) Smith, Rebecca S. Brogan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    20 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The feasibility of administering the pain reliever acetaminophen to rats via their water bottles was examined in this study. Two different preparations of acetaminophen were used, a cherry-flavored suspension and an alcohol-containing solution. Both preparations of acetaminophen were diluted to 6 mg/ml by using normal drinking water. When healthy unmanipulated rats were exposed to either of the acetaminophen preparations for the first time, the animals showed a dramatic reduction in fluid intake. A marked reduction in food intake also was associated with the cherry-flavored preparation. These reductions appear to be an expression of the well-characterized neophobic response that can be demonstrated by rodents when they encounter a novel taste. This neophobic behavior suggests that administering pain relievers to rats via their drinking water is counterproductive as a means of providing pain relief.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)15-17
    Number of pages3
    JournalContemporary Topics in Laboratory Animal Science
    Volume40
    Issue number6
    StatePublished - 2001

    Fingerprint

    acetaminophen
    Rattus norvegicus
    analgesics
    Acetaminophen
    Drinking Water
    drinking water
    Analgesics
    rats
    Pain
    pain
    analgesia
    bottles
    food intake
    Rodentia
    Suspensions
    rodents
    alcohols
    Eating
    Alcohols
    Water

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Animal Science and Zoology
    • veterinary(all)

    Cite this

    Regarding the Inadvisability of Administering Postoperative Analgesics in the Drinking Water of Rats (Rattus norvegicus). / Speth, Robert C.; Smith, M (Susan); Brogan, Rebecca S.

    In: Contemporary Topics in Laboratory Animal Science, Vol. 40, No. 6, 2001, p. 15-17.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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