Reducing secondary insults in traumatic brain injury

Jay A. Johannigman, David Zonies, Joseph Dubose, Thomas C. Blakeman, Dennis Hanseman, Richard D. Branson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the alterations in intracranial pressure (ICP) during U. S. Air Force Critical Care Air Transport Team transport of critically injured warriors with ICP monitoring by intraventricular catheter (IVC). Methods: Patients with an IVC following traumatic brain injury requiring aeromedical evacuation from Bagram to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center were studied A data logger monitored both ICP and arterial blood pressure and was equipped with an integral XYZ accelerometer to monitor movement. Results: Eleven patients were studied with full collection of data from takeoff to landing. The number of instances of ICP > 20 mm Hg ranged from 0 to 238 and duration of instances ranged from 0 to 3,281 seconds. The number of instances of ICP ± 50% of the baseline ICP ranged from 0 to 921 and duration of instances ranged from 0 to 9,054 seconds. Five of the patients did not experience ICP > 20 mm Hg throughout their flight, but 10 patients showed instances of ICP ± 50% of baseline ICP. Conclusion: Patient movement results in changes in ICP both from external stimuli (vibration, noise) and from acceleration and deceleration forces. During transport, Critical Care Air Transport Team crews should prioritize monitoring and correcting ICP including additional sedation and/or venting IVC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)50-55
Number of pages6
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume180
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Intracranial Pressure
Catheters
Air
Critical Care
Traumatic Brain Injury
Deceleration
Vibration
Noise
Arterial Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Johannigman, J. A., Zonies, D., Dubose, J., Blakeman, T. C., Hanseman, D., & Branson, R. D. (2015). Reducing secondary insults in traumatic brain injury. Military Medicine, 180(3), 50-55. https://doi.org/10.7205/MILMED-D-14-00381

Reducing secondary insults in traumatic brain injury. / Johannigman, Jay A.; Zonies, David; Dubose, Joseph; Blakeman, Thomas C.; Hanseman, Dennis; Branson, Richard D.

In: Military Medicine, Vol. 180, No. 3, 01.03.2015, p. 50-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johannigman, JA, Zonies, D, Dubose, J, Blakeman, TC, Hanseman, D & Branson, RD 2015, 'Reducing secondary insults in traumatic brain injury', Military Medicine, vol. 180, no. 3, pp. 50-55. https://doi.org/10.7205/MILMED-D-14-00381
Johannigman JA, Zonies D, Dubose J, Blakeman TC, Hanseman D, Branson RD. Reducing secondary insults in traumatic brain injury. Military Medicine. 2015 Mar 1;180(3):50-55. https://doi.org/10.7205/MILMED-D-14-00381
Johannigman, Jay A. ; Zonies, David ; Dubose, Joseph ; Blakeman, Thomas C. ; Hanseman, Dennis ; Branson, Richard D. / Reducing secondary insults in traumatic brain injury. In: Military Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 180, No. 3. pp. 50-55.
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