Reduced sleep efficiency in cervical spinal cord injury; association with abolished night time melatonin secretion

F. A J L Scheer, J. M. Zeitzer, N. T. Ayas, R. Brown, C. A. Czeisler, Steven Shea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study design: Case-controlled preliminary observational study. Objective: Melatonin is usually secreted only at night and may influence sleep. We previously found that complete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) interrupts the neural pathway required for melatonin secretion. Thus, we investigated whether the absence of night time melatonin in cervical SCI leads to sleep disturbances. Setting: General Clinical Research Center, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, USA. Methods: In an ancillary analysis of data collected in a prior study, we assessed the sleep patterns of three subjects with cervical SCI plus absence of nocturnal melatonin (SCI levels: C4A, C6A, C6/7A) and two control patients with thoracic SCI plus normal melatonin rhythms (SCI levels: T4A, T5A). We also compared those results to the sleep patterns of 10 healthy control subjects. Results: The subjects with cervical SCI had significantly lower sleep efficiency (median 83%) than the control subjects with thoracic SCI (93%). The sleep efficiency of subjects with thoracic SCI was not different from that of healthy control subjects (94%). There was no difference in the proportion of the different sleep stages, although there was a significantly increased REM-onset latency in subjects with cervical SCI (220 min) as compared to subjects with thoracic SCI (34 min). The diminished sleep in cervical SCI was not associated with sleep apnea or medication use. Conclusion: We found that cervical SCI is associated with decreased sleep quality. A larger study is required to confirm these findings. If confirmed, the absence of night time melatonin in cervical SCI may help explain their sleep disturbances, raising the possibility that melatonin replacement therapy could help normalize sleep in this group. Sponsorship: This work was supported by the NIH (GCRC Grant M01-RR-02635 and Grant HL-64815). Dr Ayas is supported by the BCLA, CIHR, and MSFHR.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)78-81
Number of pages4
JournalSpinal Cord
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Melatonin
Spinal Cord Injuries
Sleep
Thoracic Injuries
Cervical Cord
Healthy Volunteers
Neural Pathways
Sleep Stages
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Observational Studies

Keywords

  • Circadian
  • Melatonin
  • Polysomnography
  • Sleep
  • Spinal cord injuries
  • Tetraplegia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Reduced sleep efficiency in cervical spinal cord injury; association with abolished night time melatonin secretion. / Scheer, F. A J L; Zeitzer, J. M.; Ayas, N. T.; Brown, R.; Czeisler, C. A.; Shea, Steven.

In: Spinal Cord, Vol. 44, No. 2, 02.2006, p. 78-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scheer, F. A J L ; Zeitzer, J. M. ; Ayas, N. T. ; Brown, R. ; Czeisler, C. A. ; Shea, Steven. / Reduced sleep efficiency in cervical spinal cord injury; association with abolished night time melatonin secretion. In: Spinal Cord. 2006 ; Vol. 44, No. 2. pp. 78-81.
@article{8f795c0dd31f4326b2df4100d3dbcbf9,
title = "Reduced sleep efficiency in cervical spinal cord injury; association with abolished night time melatonin secretion",
abstract = "Study design: Case-controlled preliminary observational study. Objective: Melatonin is usually secreted only at night and may influence sleep. We previously found that complete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) interrupts the neural pathway required for melatonin secretion. Thus, we investigated whether the absence of night time melatonin in cervical SCI leads to sleep disturbances. Setting: General Clinical Research Center, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, USA. Methods: In an ancillary analysis of data collected in a prior study, we assessed the sleep patterns of three subjects with cervical SCI plus absence of nocturnal melatonin (SCI levels: C4A, C6A, C6/7A) and two control patients with thoracic SCI plus normal melatonin rhythms (SCI levels: T4A, T5A). We also compared those results to the sleep patterns of 10 healthy control subjects. Results: The subjects with cervical SCI had significantly lower sleep efficiency (median 83{\%}) than the control subjects with thoracic SCI (93{\%}). The sleep efficiency of subjects with thoracic SCI was not different from that of healthy control subjects (94{\%}). There was no difference in the proportion of the different sleep stages, although there was a significantly increased REM-onset latency in subjects with cervical SCI (220 min) as compared to subjects with thoracic SCI (34 min). The diminished sleep in cervical SCI was not associated with sleep apnea or medication use. Conclusion: We found that cervical SCI is associated with decreased sleep quality. A larger study is required to confirm these findings. If confirmed, the absence of night time melatonin in cervical SCI may help explain their sleep disturbances, raising the possibility that melatonin replacement therapy could help normalize sleep in this group. Sponsorship: This work was supported by the NIH (GCRC Grant M01-RR-02635 and Grant HL-64815). Dr Ayas is supported by the BCLA, CIHR, and MSFHR.",
keywords = "Circadian, Melatonin, Polysomnography, Sleep, Spinal cord injuries, Tetraplegia",
author = "Scheer, {F. A J L} and Zeitzer, {J. M.} and Ayas, {N. T.} and R. Brown and Czeisler, {C. A.} and Steven Shea",
year = "2006",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1038/sj.sc.3101784",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "44",
pages = "78--81",
journal = "Spinal Cord",
issn = "1362-4393",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reduced sleep efficiency in cervical spinal cord injury; association with abolished night time melatonin secretion

AU - Scheer, F. A J L

AU - Zeitzer, J. M.

AU - Ayas, N. T.

AU - Brown, R.

AU - Czeisler, C. A.

AU - Shea, Steven

PY - 2006/2

Y1 - 2006/2

N2 - Study design: Case-controlled preliminary observational study. Objective: Melatonin is usually secreted only at night and may influence sleep. We previously found that complete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) interrupts the neural pathway required for melatonin secretion. Thus, we investigated whether the absence of night time melatonin in cervical SCI leads to sleep disturbances. Setting: General Clinical Research Center, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, USA. Methods: In an ancillary analysis of data collected in a prior study, we assessed the sleep patterns of three subjects with cervical SCI plus absence of nocturnal melatonin (SCI levels: C4A, C6A, C6/7A) and two control patients with thoracic SCI plus normal melatonin rhythms (SCI levels: T4A, T5A). We also compared those results to the sleep patterns of 10 healthy control subjects. Results: The subjects with cervical SCI had significantly lower sleep efficiency (median 83%) than the control subjects with thoracic SCI (93%). The sleep efficiency of subjects with thoracic SCI was not different from that of healthy control subjects (94%). There was no difference in the proportion of the different sleep stages, although there was a significantly increased REM-onset latency in subjects with cervical SCI (220 min) as compared to subjects with thoracic SCI (34 min). The diminished sleep in cervical SCI was not associated with sleep apnea or medication use. Conclusion: We found that cervical SCI is associated with decreased sleep quality. A larger study is required to confirm these findings. If confirmed, the absence of night time melatonin in cervical SCI may help explain their sleep disturbances, raising the possibility that melatonin replacement therapy could help normalize sleep in this group. Sponsorship: This work was supported by the NIH (GCRC Grant M01-RR-02635 and Grant HL-64815). Dr Ayas is supported by the BCLA, CIHR, and MSFHR.

AB - Study design: Case-controlled preliminary observational study. Objective: Melatonin is usually secreted only at night and may influence sleep. We previously found that complete cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) interrupts the neural pathway required for melatonin secretion. Thus, we investigated whether the absence of night time melatonin in cervical SCI leads to sleep disturbances. Setting: General Clinical Research Center, Brigham & Women's Hospital, Boston, USA. Methods: In an ancillary analysis of data collected in a prior study, we assessed the sleep patterns of three subjects with cervical SCI plus absence of nocturnal melatonin (SCI levels: C4A, C6A, C6/7A) and two control patients with thoracic SCI plus normal melatonin rhythms (SCI levels: T4A, T5A). We also compared those results to the sleep patterns of 10 healthy control subjects. Results: The subjects with cervical SCI had significantly lower sleep efficiency (median 83%) than the control subjects with thoracic SCI (93%). The sleep efficiency of subjects with thoracic SCI was not different from that of healthy control subjects (94%). There was no difference in the proportion of the different sleep stages, although there was a significantly increased REM-onset latency in subjects with cervical SCI (220 min) as compared to subjects with thoracic SCI (34 min). The diminished sleep in cervical SCI was not associated with sleep apnea or medication use. Conclusion: We found that cervical SCI is associated with decreased sleep quality. A larger study is required to confirm these findings. If confirmed, the absence of night time melatonin in cervical SCI may help explain their sleep disturbances, raising the possibility that melatonin replacement therapy could help normalize sleep in this group. Sponsorship: This work was supported by the NIH (GCRC Grant M01-RR-02635 and Grant HL-64815). Dr Ayas is supported by the BCLA, CIHR, and MSFHR.

KW - Circadian

KW - Melatonin

KW - Polysomnography

KW - Sleep

KW - Spinal cord injuries

KW - Tetraplegia

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=31944452165&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=31944452165&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/sj.sc.3101784

DO - 10.1038/sj.sc.3101784

M3 - Article

C2 - 16130027

AN - SCOPUS:31944452165

VL - 44

SP - 78

EP - 81

JO - Spinal Cord

JF - Spinal Cord

SN - 1362-4393

IS - 2

ER -