Reduced infant rhesus macaque growth rates due to environmental enteric dysfunction and association with histopathology in the large intestine

Sara M. Hendrickson, Archana Thomas, Kamm Prongay, Andrew J. Haertel, Laura M. Garzel, Leanne Gill, Tasha Barr, Nicholas S. Rhoades, Rachel Reader, Mark Galan, Julie M. Carroll, Charles T. Roberts, Lina Gao, Ian J. Amanna, Ilhem Messaoudi, Mark K. Slifka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Environmental enteric dysfunction is associated with malnutrition as well as infant growth stunting and has been classically defined by villous blunting, decreased crypt-to-villus ratio, and inflammation in the small intestine. Here, we characterized environmental enteric dysfunction among infant rhesus macaques that are naturally exposed to enteric pathogens commonly linked to human growth stunting. Remarkably, despite villous atrophy and histological abnormalities observed in the small intestine, poor growth trajectories and low serum tryptophan levels were correlated with increased histopathology in the large intestine. This work provides insight into the mechanisms underlying this disease and indicates that the large intestine may be an important target for therapeutic intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number234
JournalNature communications
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • General
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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