Reduced hippocampal volume among adolescents with alcohol use disorders without psychiatric comorbidity

Bonnie Nagel, Alecia D. Schweinsburg, Vinh Phan, Susan F. Tapert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

196 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies have suggested that teens with alcohol use disorder (AUD) can demonstrate memory deficits, but the underlying neuroanatomical substrates are unclear. The hippocampus is crucial to intact memory functioning, and it actively develops during adolescence. The current study attempted to replicate and extend previous findings suggesting that adolescents with AUD show smaller hippocampal volumes than healthy adolescents. Manual tracings of bilateral hippocampi were performed on structural magnetic resonance images of 14 adolescents (ages 15 to 17 years) with AUD and 17 healthy comparison teens. Intracranial, white, and gray matter volumes, as well as memory abilities, were also measured. Results revealed that adolescents with AUD had significantly smaller left hippocampal volumes than healthy teens, even after removal of teens with comorbid conduct disorder from the analyses. In contrast the groups did not differ in right hippocampal, intracranial, gray or white matter volumes, or memory performance. Hippocampal volumes were not related to alcohol-consumption rates. These findings indicate that adolescents with AUD, but free from other psychiatric comorbidities, have reduced left hippocampal volume. Because hippocampal volume did not relate to alcohol use characteristics, it is possible that premorbid volumetric differences could account for some of the observed group differences in hippocampal volume.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)181-190
Number of pages10
JournalPsychiatry Research - Neuroimaging
Volume139
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 30 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Psychiatry
Comorbidity
Alcohols
Hippocampus
Conduct Disorder
Aptitude
Memory Disorders
Underage Drinking
Alcohol Drinking
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Alcoholism
  • Brain
  • Hippocampus
  • MRI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Reduced hippocampal volume among adolescents with alcohol use disorders without psychiatric comorbidity. / Nagel, Bonnie; Schweinsburg, Alecia D.; Phan, Vinh; Tapert, Susan F.

In: Psychiatry Research - Neuroimaging, Vol. 139, No. 3, 30.08.2005, p. 181-190.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nagel, Bonnie ; Schweinsburg, Alecia D. ; Phan, Vinh ; Tapert, Susan F. / Reduced hippocampal volume among adolescents with alcohol use disorders without psychiatric comorbidity. In: Psychiatry Research - Neuroimaging. 2005 ; Vol. 139, No. 3. pp. 181-190.
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