Reduced cerebellar brain activity during reward processing in adolescent binge drinkers

Anita Cservenka, Scott A. Jones, Bonnie Nagel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Due to ongoing development, adolescence may be a period of heightened vulnerability to the neurotoxic effects of alcohol. Binge drinking may alter reward-driven behavior and neurocircuitry, thereby increasing risk for escalating alcohol use. Therefore, we compared reward processing in adolescents with and without a history of recent binge drinking. At their baseline study visit, all participants (age = 14.86. ±. 0.88) were free of heavy alcohol use and completed a modified version of the Wheel of Fortune (WOF) functional magnetic resonance imaging task. Following this visit, 17 youth reported binge drinking on ≥3 occasions within a 90 day period and were matched to 17 youth who remained alcohol and substance-naïve. All participants repeated the WOF task during a second visit (age = 16.83. ±. 1.22). No significant effects were found in a region of interest analysis of the ventral striatum, but whole-brain analyses showed significant group differences in reward response at the second study visit in the left cerebellum, controlling for baseline visit brain activity (p/. α

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDevelopmental Cognitive Neuroscience
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Dec 19 2014

Fingerprint

Binge Drinking
Reward
Alcohols
Brain
Cerebellum
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Fortune

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Alcohol
  • Binge
  • Cerebellum
  • Reward

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Reduced cerebellar brain activity during reward processing in adolescent binge drinkers. / Cservenka, Anita; Jones, Scott A.; Nagel, Bonnie.

In: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, 19.12.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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