Recruitment of Academic Psychiatrists

Applicants’ Decision Factors

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To explore factors influencing academic job seekers, the author surveyed 49 applicants for six regular faculty positions at a university and Veterans Affairs (VA) medical center in Oregon. Candidates used active inquiry (40.0%) and advertisements (35.6%) as their pri-mary search methods, applied for an average of 6.75 jobs, expected the search to take 73 months, and confined their search to specific geographical areas (75.5%). In rank order, location, academic position, teaching opportunities, and research opportunities were the most appealing factors; VA hospital setting, fringe benefits, and administrative opportu-nities had the least appeal. Most applicants were moderately satisfied with current jobs and even more satisfied with psychiatry as a career. Related studies are discussed. Three of the six positions were not filled; the author discusses barriers to successfully recruiting academic psychiatrists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-146
Number of pages6
JournalAcademic Psychiatry
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992

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psychiatrist
applicant
Psychiatry
teaching position
job seeker
Veterans Hospitals
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Veterans
psychiatry
appeal
Teaching
candidacy
career
university
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Education

Cite this

Recruitment of Academic Psychiatrists : Applicants’ Decision Factors. / Sparr, Landy.

In: Academic Psychiatry, Vol. 16, No. 3, 1992, p. 141-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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