Re-Conceptualizing developmental areas of assessment for screening, eligibility determination and program planning in early intervention

Bonnie Keilty, Patricia Blasco, Serra Acar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Contemporary recommended practices in early childhood assessment strive to gain a holistic picture of child learning and development to inform screening, eligibility, and program planning decisions. These practices have traditionally focused on competencies reflected in developmental domains with limited attention to the approaches-tolearning used to acquire those competencies. In this article, we call for the examination of early childhood constructs that impact a child's ability to learn and develop, such as executive function (EF), mastery motivation, self-regulation and selfdetermination, specifically in the infant-toddler period. With EF defined as a wide range of central control processes in the brain that link and categorize information that is discernible in cognitive, motor, and behavioral responses [1], we propose a model of EF as the core construct that drives and unites these learning processes and describe how the model can be applied to Part C early intervention screening, assessment, eligibility determination, and program planning, as well as identify future directions in research and personnel preparation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)218-229
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Intellectual Disability - Diagnosis and Treatment
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Eligibility Determination
program planning
Executive Function
childhood
Learning
Aptitude
control process
Child Development
self-regulation
Motivation
learning process
infant
brain
personnel
Research Personnel
examination
Brain
ability
learning

Keywords

  • Approaches-to-learning
  • Assessment
  • Early intervention
  • Eligibility
  • Executive function
  • Program planning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

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abstract = "Contemporary recommended practices in early childhood assessment strive to gain a holistic picture of child learning and development to inform screening, eligibility, and program planning decisions. These practices have traditionally focused on competencies reflected in developmental domains with limited attention to the approaches-tolearning used to acquire those competencies. In this article, we call for the examination of early childhood constructs that impact a child's ability to learn and develop, such as executive function (EF), mastery motivation, self-regulation and selfdetermination, specifically in the infant-toddler period. With EF defined as a wide range of central control processes in the brain that link and categorize information that is discernible in cognitive, motor, and behavioral responses [1], we propose a model of EF as the core construct that drives and unites these learning processes and describe how the model can be applied to Part C early intervention screening, assessment, eligibility determination, and program planning, as well as identify future directions in research and personnel preparation.",
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