Исследование Событий, Которые Привели К Пандемии Covid-19

Translated title of the contribution: Questioning The Early Events Leading To The Covid-19 Pandemic

J. Reis, R. Frutos, A. Buguet, A. Le Faou, G. Sandner, G. C. Román, P. S. Spencer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Sixteen months after the January 30, 2020 declaration by the World Health Organization of a Public Health Emergency of International Concern regarding the spread of COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2 had infected ~ 170 million humans world-wide of which > 3.5 million had died. We critically examine information on the virus origin, when and where the first human cases occurred, and point to differences between Chinese and later clinical presentations. The official patient Zero was hospitalized in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, on December 8, 2019, but retrospective analyses demonstrate prior viral circulation. Coronaviruses are present in mammals and birds, but whether a wild animal (e.g. bat, pangolin) was the source of the human pandemic remains disputed. We present two contamination models, the spillover versus the circulation model; the latter brings some interesting hypotheses about previous SARS-CoV-2 virus circulation in the human population. The age distribution of hospitalized COVID-19 patients at the start of the epidemic differed between China and the USA–EU; Chinese hospitalized patients were notably younger. The first Chinese publications did not describe anosmia-dysgeusia, a cardinal symptom of COVID-19 in Europe and USA. The prominent endothelial involvement linked with thrombotic complications was discovered later. These clinical discrepancies might suggest an evolution of the virus.

Translated title of the contributionQuestioning The Early Events Leading To The Covid-19 Pandemic
Original languageRussian
Pages (from-to)4-16
Number of pages13
JournalHealth Risk Analysis
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Autopsies
  • Clinical presentation
  • Dysgeusia anosmia
  • Patient zero
  • Sars-cov-2 diagnostics
  • Zoonotic disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Health Informatics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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