Quantity and quality of trabecular bone in the femur are enhanced by a strongly anabolic, noninvasive mechanical intervention

Yi Xian Qin, Wei Lin, Kenneth McLeod, Erik Mittra, Ralph Müller, A. Simon Turner, Clinton Rubin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

223 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The skeleton's sensitivity to mechanical stimuli represents a critical determinant of bone mass and morphology. We have proposed that the extremely low level (<10 microstrain), high frequency (20-50 Hz) mechanical strains, continually present during even subtle activities such as standing are as important to defining the skeleton as the larger strains typically associated with vigorous activity (>2000 microstrain). If these low-level strains are indeed anabolic, then this sensitivity could serve as the basis for a biomechanically based intervention for osteoporosis. To evaluate this hypothesis, the hindlimbs of adult female sheep were stimulated for 20 minutes/day using a noninvasive 0.3g vertical oscillation sufficient to induce approximately 5 microstrain on the cortex of the tibia. After 1 year of stimulation, the physical properties of 10-mm cubes of trabecular bone from the distal femoral condyle of experimental animals (n = 8) were compared with controls (n = 9), as evaluated using microcomputed tomography (μCT) scanning and materials testing. Bone mineral content (BMC) was 10.6% greater (p < 0.05), and the trabecular number (Tb.N) was 8.3% higher in the experimental animals (p < 0.01), and trabecular spacing decreased by 11.3% (p < 0.01), indicating that bone quantity was increased both by the creation of new trabeculae and the thickening of existing trabeculae. The trabecular bone pattern factor (TBPf) decreased 24.2% (p < 0.03), indicating trabecular morphology adapting from rod shape to plate shape. Significant increases in stiffness and strength were observed in the longitudinal direction (12.1% and 26.7%, respectively; both, p < 0.05), indicating that the adaptation occurred primarily in the plane of weightbearing. These results show that extremely low level mechanical stimuli improve both the quantity and the quality of trabecular bone. That these deformations are several orders of magnitude below those peak strains which arise during vigorous activity indicates that this biomechanically based signal may serve as an effective intervention for osteoporosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-357
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Bone and Mineral Research
Volume17
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Femur
Bone and Bones
Osteoporosis
Physical Stimulation
Materials Testing
X-Ray Microtomography
Weight-Bearing
Hindlimb
Thigh
Tibia
Skeleton
Bone Density
Sheep
Cancellous Bone
Direction compound

Keywords

  • Anabolic
  • Bone formation
  • Bone quality
  • Osteogenic
  • Osteoporosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Quantity and quality of trabecular bone in the femur are enhanced by a strongly anabolic, noninvasive mechanical intervention. / Qin, Yi Xian; Lin, Wei; McLeod, Kenneth; Mittra, Erik; Müller, Ralph; Turner, A. Simon; Rubin, Clinton.

In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, Vol. 17, No. 2, 01.01.2002, p. 349-357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Qin, Yi Xian ; Lin, Wei ; McLeod, Kenneth ; Mittra, Erik ; Müller, Ralph ; Turner, A. Simon ; Rubin, Clinton. / Quantity and quality of trabecular bone in the femur are enhanced by a strongly anabolic, noninvasive mechanical intervention. In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2002 ; Vol. 17, No. 2. pp. 349-357.
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