Quality of long-term survival in young children with medulloblastoma

D. L. Johnson, M. A. McCabe, H. S. Nicholson, A. L. Joseph, P. R. Getson, J. Byrne, C. Brasseux, R. J. Packer, G. Reaman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The reported success of treatment for children with medulloblastoma must be balanced against the effect that treatment has on the quality of life of long-term survivors. The outcome of long-term survivors reported in previous studies has been conflicting. The authors evaluate the mental and behavioral skills of a group of medulloblastoma survivors from their institution, all of whom had survived for more than 5 years postdiagnosis. A review of the institutional records yielded 32 patients. Twenty-three families were interviewed by telephone and, of these, 13 subjects came to the hospital for detailed neuropsychological and neurological evaluations. Intelligence quotient (IQ) was less than 90 for all participants tested, and patients diagnosed before the age of 3 years had lower IQ scores on average than those diagnosed later. Mean IQ and achievement test scores in reading, spelling, and mathematics were all higher in survivors who had undergone shunting. Achievement test results were often not in accord with intellectual potential, and individual intellectual skills varied widely. Perceptual- motor task performance was below average in more than 50% of the participants, but motor dexterity was more severely affected than perception. Problems in learning and a delay in both physical growth and development were seen in a majority of participants. This study directs attention to the serious difficulties faced by long-term survivors of medulloblastoma and their families, and underscores the importance of routine neuropsychological testing. Moreover, the study provides further impetus to seek alternatives to irradiation in the treatment of malignant brain tumors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1004-1010
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume80
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Medulloblastoma
Survivors
Intelligence
Survival
Psychomotor Performance
Mathematics
Task Performance and Analysis
Growth and Development
Telephone
Brain Neoplasms
Reading
Therapeutics
Quality of Life
Learning

Keywords

  • brain neoplasm
  • children
  • long-term survival
  • medulloblastoma
  • outcome
  • radiation therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Johnson, D. L., McCabe, M. A., Nicholson, H. S., Joseph, A. L., Getson, P. R., Byrne, J., ... Reaman, G. (1994). Quality of long-term survival in young children with medulloblastoma. Journal of Neurosurgery, 80(6), 1004-1010.

Quality of long-term survival in young children with medulloblastoma. / Johnson, D. L.; McCabe, M. A.; Nicholson, H. S.; Joseph, A. L.; Getson, P. R.; Byrne, J.; Brasseux, C.; Packer, R. J.; Reaman, G.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 80, No. 6, 1994, p. 1004-1010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnson, DL, McCabe, MA, Nicholson, HS, Joseph, AL, Getson, PR, Byrne, J, Brasseux, C, Packer, RJ & Reaman, G 1994, 'Quality of long-term survival in young children with medulloblastoma', Journal of Neurosurgery, vol. 80, no. 6, pp. 1004-1010.
Johnson DL, McCabe MA, Nicholson HS, Joseph AL, Getson PR, Byrne J et al. Quality of long-term survival in young children with medulloblastoma. Journal of Neurosurgery. 1994;80(6):1004-1010.
Johnson, D. L. ; McCabe, M. A. ; Nicholson, H. S. ; Joseph, A. L. ; Getson, P. R. ; Byrne, J. ; Brasseux, C. ; Packer, R. J. ; Reaman, G. / Quality of long-term survival in young children with medulloblastoma. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 1994 ; Vol. 80, No. 6. pp. 1004-1010.
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