Pulmonary nodules and the CT halo sign

Steven Primack, Thomas E. Hartman, Kyung Soo Lee, Nestor L. Müller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

192 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine whether the 'halo sign' at computed tomography (CT) could be used to differentiate hemorrhagic from nonhemorrhagic pulmonary nodules. MATERIALS AND METHODS: CT scans of 12 patients with hemorrhagic pulmonary nodules and of a control group of 10 patients with nonhemorrhagic pulmonary nodules were randomized and reviewed by two chest radiologists. Nodules were considered hemorrhagic if a surrounding halo of ground-glass attenuation was present. RESULTS: Nodules were correctly identified as either hemorrhagic or nonhemorrhagic by both observers in 19 of the 22 cases (86%). Eight of the 12 patients with hemorrhagic nodules had an infectious process including invasive aspergillosis, candidiasis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, or coccidioidomycosis. Four of 12 patients with hemorrhagic nodules had a noninfectious cause including Wegener granulomatosis, metastatic angiosarcoma, and Kaposi sarcoma. CONCLUSION: Most hemorrhagic pulmonary nodules have a characteristic CT appearance consisting of a central area of soft-tissue attenuation with a surrounding halo of ground-glass attenuation that allows distinction from nonhemorrhagic nodules.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)513-515
Number of pages3
JournalRadiology
Volume190
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tomography
Lung
Glass
Invasive Candidiasis
Coccidioidomycosis
Hemangiosarcoma
Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis
Aspergillosis
Kaposi's Sarcoma
Simplexvirus
Cytomegalovirus
Thorax
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Aspergillosis
  • Candidiasis
  • Coccidioidomycosis
  • Cytomegalovirus
  • Lung neoplasms, secondary
  • Lung, infection
  • Lung, nodule
  • Wegener granulomatosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Primack, S., Hartman, T. E., Lee, K. S., & Müller, N. L. (1994). Pulmonary nodules and the CT halo sign. Radiology, 190(2), 513-515.

Pulmonary nodules and the CT halo sign. / Primack, Steven; Hartman, Thomas E.; Lee, Kyung Soo; Müller, Nestor L.

In: Radiology, Vol. 190, No. 2, 02.1994, p. 513-515.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Primack, S, Hartman, TE, Lee, KS & Müller, NL 1994, 'Pulmonary nodules and the CT halo sign', Radiology, vol. 190, no. 2, pp. 513-515.
Primack S, Hartman TE, Lee KS, Müller NL. Pulmonary nodules and the CT halo sign. Radiology. 1994 Feb;190(2):513-515.
Primack, Steven ; Hartman, Thomas E. ; Lee, Kyung Soo ; Müller, Nestor L. / Pulmonary nodules and the CT halo sign. In: Radiology. 1994 ; Vol. 190, No. 2. pp. 513-515.
@article{6d07da6a37af4370bbea5c5b1e61e203,
title = "Pulmonary nodules and the CT halo sign",
abstract = "PURPOSE: To determine whether the 'halo sign' at computed tomography (CT) could be used to differentiate hemorrhagic from nonhemorrhagic pulmonary nodules. MATERIALS AND METHODS: CT scans of 12 patients with hemorrhagic pulmonary nodules and of a control group of 10 patients with nonhemorrhagic pulmonary nodules were randomized and reviewed by two chest radiologists. Nodules were considered hemorrhagic if a surrounding halo of ground-glass attenuation was present. RESULTS: Nodules were correctly identified as either hemorrhagic or nonhemorrhagic by both observers in 19 of the 22 cases (86{\%}). Eight of the 12 patients with hemorrhagic nodules had an infectious process including invasive aspergillosis, candidiasis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, or coccidioidomycosis. Four of 12 patients with hemorrhagic nodules had a noninfectious cause including Wegener granulomatosis, metastatic angiosarcoma, and Kaposi sarcoma. CONCLUSION: Most hemorrhagic pulmonary nodules have a characteristic CT appearance consisting of a central area of soft-tissue attenuation with a surrounding halo of ground-glass attenuation that allows distinction from nonhemorrhagic nodules.",
keywords = "Aspergillosis, Candidiasis, Coccidioidomycosis, Cytomegalovirus, Lung neoplasms, secondary, Lung, infection, Lung, nodule, Wegener granulomatosis",
author = "Steven Primack and Hartman, {Thomas E.} and Lee, {Kyung Soo} and M{\"u}ller, {Nestor L.}",
year = "1994",
month = "2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "190",
pages = "513--515",
journal = "Radiology",
issn = "0033-8419",
publisher = "Radiological Society of North America Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pulmonary nodules and the CT halo sign

AU - Primack, Steven

AU - Hartman, Thomas E.

AU - Lee, Kyung Soo

AU - Müller, Nestor L.

PY - 1994/2

Y1 - 1994/2

N2 - PURPOSE: To determine whether the 'halo sign' at computed tomography (CT) could be used to differentiate hemorrhagic from nonhemorrhagic pulmonary nodules. MATERIALS AND METHODS: CT scans of 12 patients with hemorrhagic pulmonary nodules and of a control group of 10 patients with nonhemorrhagic pulmonary nodules were randomized and reviewed by two chest radiologists. Nodules were considered hemorrhagic if a surrounding halo of ground-glass attenuation was present. RESULTS: Nodules were correctly identified as either hemorrhagic or nonhemorrhagic by both observers in 19 of the 22 cases (86%). Eight of the 12 patients with hemorrhagic nodules had an infectious process including invasive aspergillosis, candidiasis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, or coccidioidomycosis. Four of 12 patients with hemorrhagic nodules had a noninfectious cause including Wegener granulomatosis, metastatic angiosarcoma, and Kaposi sarcoma. CONCLUSION: Most hemorrhagic pulmonary nodules have a characteristic CT appearance consisting of a central area of soft-tissue attenuation with a surrounding halo of ground-glass attenuation that allows distinction from nonhemorrhagic nodules.

AB - PURPOSE: To determine whether the 'halo sign' at computed tomography (CT) could be used to differentiate hemorrhagic from nonhemorrhagic pulmonary nodules. MATERIALS AND METHODS: CT scans of 12 patients with hemorrhagic pulmonary nodules and of a control group of 10 patients with nonhemorrhagic pulmonary nodules were randomized and reviewed by two chest radiologists. Nodules were considered hemorrhagic if a surrounding halo of ground-glass attenuation was present. RESULTS: Nodules were correctly identified as either hemorrhagic or nonhemorrhagic by both observers in 19 of the 22 cases (86%). Eight of the 12 patients with hemorrhagic nodules had an infectious process including invasive aspergillosis, candidiasis, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, or coccidioidomycosis. Four of 12 patients with hemorrhagic nodules had a noninfectious cause including Wegener granulomatosis, metastatic angiosarcoma, and Kaposi sarcoma. CONCLUSION: Most hemorrhagic pulmonary nodules have a characteristic CT appearance consisting of a central area of soft-tissue attenuation with a surrounding halo of ground-glass attenuation that allows distinction from nonhemorrhagic nodules.

KW - Aspergillosis

KW - Candidiasis

KW - Coccidioidomycosis

KW - Cytomegalovirus

KW - Lung neoplasms, secondary

KW - Lung, infection

KW - Lung, nodule

KW - Wegener granulomatosis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028153947&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028153947&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 190

SP - 513

EP - 515

JO - Radiology

JF - Radiology

SN - 0033-8419

IS - 2

ER -