Psychotherapy of the victims of massive violence

Countertransference and ethical issues

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors describe some common countertransference reactions that occur in treating victimized patients with a chronic form of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The ethical principles of fidelity, nonmaleficence, beneficence, autonomy, justice, and self-interest are described as the symptoms of patients change over time. Two case histories illustrate these principles in practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)90-102
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychotherapy
Volume47
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Beneficence
Violence
Ethics
Psychotherapy
Social Justice
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Countertransference (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

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