Psychotherapy for massively traumatized refugees

The therapist variable

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    28 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In the treatment of severe posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), much emphasis is put on techniques, especially behavioral therapies. Such techniques negate the importance of the therapist as an individual in the treatment of complex PTSD as presented in severely traumatized refugees. The specific difficulties encountered by this population and the therapist responses are discussed: the need to tell the trauma story and the therapist's ability to listen; the patient's need for constancy and therapist's ability to stay; the patient's need to give and the therapist's ability to receive; the patient's problem with evil and the therapist's ability to believe. Case examples illustrate the approach and then discuss how generalizable this experience is to other populations. Research implications are suggested.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)475-490
    Number of pages16
    JournalAmerican Journal of Psychotherapy
    Volume55
    Issue number4
    StatePublished - 2001

    Fingerprint

    Refugees
    Aptitude
    Psychotherapy
    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
    Population
    Therapeutics
    Wounds and Injuries
    Research

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Psychology(all)
    • Clinical Psychology

    Cite this

    Psychotherapy for massively traumatized refugees : The therapist variable. / Kinzie, John (Dave).

    In: American Journal of Psychotherapy, Vol. 55, No. 4, 2001, p. 475-490.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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