Proximal and large hyperplastic and nondysplastic serrated polyps detected by colonoscopy are associated with neoplasia

Mitchal A. Schreiner, David G. Weiss, David Lieberman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

170 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background & Aims: The family of serrated lesions includes hyperplastic polyps and sessile serrated adenomas without dysplasia, as well as traditional serrated adenoma with dysplasia. We investigated whether detection of proximal nondysplastic serrated polyps (ND-SP) at screening and surveillance colonoscopies is associated with advanced neoplasia. Methods: The study included 3121 asymptomatic patients (aged 50-75 years) who had screening colonoscopies; 1371 had subsequent surveillance. The proximal colon was defined as segments proximal to the descending colon. Large ND-SP were defined as ≥10 mm. We compared rates of detection of any neoplasia and advanced neoplasia at screening and surveillance colonoscopies (within 5.5 years) in patients with and without proximal or large ND-SP. Results: At baseline screening, 248 patients (7.9%) had at least 1 proximal ND-SP. They were more likely than patients with no proximal ND-SP to have advanced neoplasia (17.3% vs 10.0%; odds ratio [OR], 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-2.70). Patients with large ND-SP (n = 44) were also more likely to have synchronous advanced neoplasia (OR, 3.37; 95% CI, 1.71-6.65). During surveillance, 39 patients with baseline proximal ND-SP and no neoplasia were more likely to have neoplasia compared with subjects who did not have polyps (OR, 3.14; 95% CI, 1.59-6.20). Among patients with advanced neoplasia at baseline, those with proximal ND-SP (n = 43) were more likely to have advanced neoplasia during surveillance (OR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.03-4.59). Conclusions: Detection of proximal and large ND-SP at a screening colonoscopy is associated with an increased risk for synchronous advanced neoplasia. Detection of proximal ND-SP in a baseline colonoscopy is associated with an increased risk for interval neoplasia during surveillance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1497-1502
Number of pages6
JournalGastroenterology
Volume139
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010

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Colonoscopy
Polyps
Neoplasms
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Adenoma
Descending Colon
Colon

Keywords

  • Advanced Neoplasia
  • Colon Surveillance
  • Hyperplastic Polyps
  • Serrated Polyps

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Proximal and large hyperplastic and nondysplastic serrated polyps detected by colonoscopy are associated with neoplasia. / Schreiner, Mitchal A.; Weiss, David G.; Lieberman, David.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 139, No. 5, 11.2010, p. 1497-1502.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background & Aims: The family of serrated lesions includes hyperplastic polyps and sessile serrated adenomas without dysplasia, as well as traditional serrated adenoma with dysplasia. We investigated whether detection of proximal nondysplastic serrated polyps (ND-SP) at screening and surveillance colonoscopies is associated with advanced neoplasia. Methods: The study included 3121 asymptomatic patients (aged 50-75 years) who had screening colonoscopies; 1371 had subsequent surveillance. The proximal colon was defined as segments proximal to the descending colon. Large ND-SP were defined as ≥10 mm. We compared rates of detection of any neoplasia and advanced neoplasia at screening and surveillance colonoscopies (within 5.5 years) in patients with and without proximal or large ND-SP. Results: At baseline screening, 248 patients (7.9{\%}) had at least 1 proximal ND-SP. They were more likely than patients with no proximal ND-SP to have advanced neoplasia (17.3{\%} vs 10.0{\%}; odds ratio [OR], 1.90; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.33-2.70). Patients with large ND-SP (n = 44) were also more likely to have synchronous advanced neoplasia (OR, 3.37; 95{\%} CI, 1.71-6.65). During surveillance, 39 patients with baseline proximal ND-SP and no neoplasia were more likely to have neoplasia compared with subjects who did not have polyps (OR, 3.14; 95{\%} CI, 1.59-6.20). Among patients with advanced neoplasia at baseline, those with proximal ND-SP (n = 43) were more likely to have advanced neoplasia during surveillance (OR, 2.17; 95{\%} CI, 1.03-4.59). Conclusions: Detection of proximal and large ND-SP at a screening colonoscopy is associated with an increased risk for synchronous advanced neoplasia. Detection of proximal ND-SP in a baseline colonoscopy is associated with an increased risk for interval neoplasia during surveillance.",
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AU - Weiss, David G.

AU - Lieberman, David

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N2 - Background & Aims: The family of serrated lesions includes hyperplastic polyps and sessile serrated adenomas without dysplasia, as well as traditional serrated adenoma with dysplasia. We investigated whether detection of proximal nondysplastic serrated polyps (ND-SP) at screening and surveillance colonoscopies is associated with advanced neoplasia. Methods: The study included 3121 asymptomatic patients (aged 50-75 years) who had screening colonoscopies; 1371 had subsequent surveillance. The proximal colon was defined as segments proximal to the descending colon. Large ND-SP were defined as ≥10 mm. We compared rates of detection of any neoplasia and advanced neoplasia at screening and surveillance colonoscopies (within 5.5 years) in patients with and without proximal or large ND-SP. Results: At baseline screening, 248 patients (7.9%) had at least 1 proximal ND-SP. They were more likely than patients with no proximal ND-SP to have advanced neoplasia (17.3% vs 10.0%; odds ratio [OR], 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-2.70). Patients with large ND-SP (n = 44) were also more likely to have synchronous advanced neoplasia (OR, 3.37; 95% CI, 1.71-6.65). During surveillance, 39 patients with baseline proximal ND-SP and no neoplasia were more likely to have neoplasia compared with subjects who did not have polyps (OR, 3.14; 95% CI, 1.59-6.20). Among patients with advanced neoplasia at baseline, those with proximal ND-SP (n = 43) were more likely to have advanced neoplasia during surveillance (OR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.03-4.59). Conclusions: Detection of proximal and large ND-SP at a screening colonoscopy is associated with an increased risk for synchronous advanced neoplasia. Detection of proximal ND-SP in a baseline colonoscopy is associated with an increased risk for interval neoplasia during surveillance.

AB - Background & Aims: The family of serrated lesions includes hyperplastic polyps and sessile serrated adenomas without dysplasia, as well as traditional serrated adenoma with dysplasia. We investigated whether detection of proximal nondysplastic serrated polyps (ND-SP) at screening and surveillance colonoscopies is associated with advanced neoplasia. Methods: The study included 3121 asymptomatic patients (aged 50-75 years) who had screening colonoscopies; 1371 had subsequent surveillance. The proximal colon was defined as segments proximal to the descending colon. Large ND-SP were defined as ≥10 mm. We compared rates of detection of any neoplasia and advanced neoplasia at screening and surveillance colonoscopies (within 5.5 years) in patients with and without proximal or large ND-SP. Results: At baseline screening, 248 patients (7.9%) had at least 1 proximal ND-SP. They were more likely than patients with no proximal ND-SP to have advanced neoplasia (17.3% vs 10.0%; odds ratio [OR], 1.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33-2.70). Patients with large ND-SP (n = 44) were also more likely to have synchronous advanced neoplasia (OR, 3.37; 95% CI, 1.71-6.65). During surveillance, 39 patients with baseline proximal ND-SP and no neoplasia were more likely to have neoplasia compared with subjects who did not have polyps (OR, 3.14; 95% CI, 1.59-6.20). Among patients with advanced neoplasia at baseline, those with proximal ND-SP (n = 43) were more likely to have advanced neoplasia during surveillance (OR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.03-4.59). Conclusions: Detection of proximal and large ND-SP at a screening colonoscopy is associated with an increased risk for synchronous advanced neoplasia. Detection of proximal ND-SP in a baseline colonoscopy is associated with an increased risk for interval neoplasia during surveillance.

KW - Advanced Neoplasia

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KW - Hyperplastic Polyps

KW - Serrated Polyps

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