Provider and state perspectives on implementing cultural-based models of care for American Indian and Alaska Native patients with substance use disorders

Raina L. Croff, Traci Rieckmann, John Doug Spence

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) suffer disproportionate rates of substance use disorders compared to Americans overall. Providers serving AI/AN communities are drawing from a diverse toolkit of treatment strategies that incorporate Native worldviews and community-shared values in order to improve outcomes. This paper describes findings from interviews with 22 program directors and 18 representatives from Single State Authorities on substance abuse. Interviews assessed provider and state efforts to increase AI/AN client engagement and to improve the quality of care through culturally relevant interventions. Results suggested that providers employed flexibility and originality to cultural-based programs by broadening established practices, adopting outside traditions, and creating new ones to fit client needs. However, gaps in state-tribal collaborations and inter-group complexities such as staff-based tensions, a widening generational divide, and blurred consensus of "tradition" affect service delivery. Overall, respondents underlined the critical role culturally relevant care plays in individual and community healing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)64-79
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Behavioral Health Services and Research
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

Fingerprint

North American Indians
American Indian
Substance-Related Disorders
Interviews
community
state authority
Quality of Health Care
interview
worldview
substance abuse
director
Consensus
flexibility
staff
Alaska Natives
Values
Group
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Provider and state perspectives on implementing cultural-based models of care for American Indian and Alaska Native patients with substance use disorders. / Croff, Raina L.; Rieckmann, Traci; Spence, John Doug.

In: Journal of Behavioral Health Services and Research, Vol. 41, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 64-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{303e4154c842492597697cb7493ad2d1,
title = "Provider and state perspectives on implementing cultural-based models of care for American Indian and Alaska Native patients with substance use disorders",
abstract = "American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) suffer disproportionate rates of substance use disorders compared to Americans overall. Providers serving AI/AN communities are drawing from a diverse toolkit of treatment strategies that incorporate Native worldviews and community-shared values in order to improve outcomes. This paper describes findings from interviews with 22 program directors and 18 representatives from Single State Authorities on substance abuse. Interviews assessed provider and state efforts to increase AI/AN client engagement and to improve the quality of care through culturally relevant interventions. Results suggested that providers employed flexibility and originality to cultural-based programs by broadening established practices, adopting outside traditions, and creating new ones to fit client needs. However, gaps in state-tribal collaborations and inter-group complexities such as staff-based tensions, a widening generational divide, and blurred consensus of {"}tradition{"} affect service delivery. Overall, respondents underlined the critical role culturally relevant care plays in individual and community healing.",
author = "Croff, {Raina L.} and Traci Rieckmann and Spence, {John Doug}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11414-013-9322-6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "41",
pages = "64--79",
journal = "Journal of Behavioral Health Services and Research",
issn = "1094-3412",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Provider and state perspectives on implementing cultural-based models of care for American Indian and Alaska Native patients with substance use disorders

AU - Croff, Raina L.

AU - Rieckmann, Traci

AU - Spence, John Doug

PY - 2014/1

Y1 - 2014/1

N2 - American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) suffer disproportionate rates of substance use disorders compared to Americans overall. Providers serving AI/AN communities are drawing from a diverse toolkit of treatment strategies that incorporate Native worldviews and community-shared values in order to improve outcomes. This paper describes findings from interviews with 22 program directors and 18 representatives from Single State Authorities on substance abuse. Interviews assessed provider and state efforts to increase AI/AN client engagement and to improve the quality of care through culturally relevant interventions. Results suggested that providers employed flexibility and originality to cultural-based programs by broadening established practices, adopting outside traditions, and creating new ones to fit client needs. However, gaps in state-tribal collaborations and inter-group complexities such as staff-based tensions, a widening generational divide, and blurred consensus of "tradition" affect service delivery. Overall, respondents underlined the critical role culturally relevant care plays in individual and community healing.

AB - American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) suffer disproportionate rates of substance use disorders compared to Americans overall. Providers serving AI/AN communities are drawing from a diverse toolkit of treatment strategies that incorporate Native worldviews and community-shared values in order to improve outcomes. This paper describes findings from interviews with 22 program directors and 18 representatives from Single State Authorities on substance abuse. Interviews assessed provider and state efforts to increase AI/AN client engagement and to improve the quality of care through culturally relevant interventions. Results suggested that providers employed flexibility and originality to cultural-based programs by broadening established practices, adopting outside traditions, and creating new ones to fit client needs. However, gaps in state-tribal collaborations and inter-group complexities such as staff-based tensions, a widening generational divide, and blurred consensus of "tradition" affect service delivery. Overall, respondents underlined the critical role culturally relevant care plays in individual and community healing.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84892583704&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84892583704&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11414-013-9322-6

DO - 10.1007/s11414-013-9322-6

M3 - Article

C2 - 23430286

AN - SCOPUS:84892583704

VL - 41

SP - 64

EP - 79

JO - Journal of Behavioral Health Services and Research

JF - Journal of Behavioral Health Services and Research

SN - 1094-3412

IS - 1

ER -