Prophylactic oral betamimetics for reducing preterm birth in women with a twin pregnancy

Waralak Yamasmit, Surasith Chaithongwongwatthana, Jorge Tolosa, Sompop Limpongsanurak, Leonardo Pereira, Pisake Lumbiganon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Twin pregnancies are associated with a high risk of neonatal mortality and morbidity due to an increased rate of preterm birth. Betamimetics can decrease contraction frequency or delay preterm birth in singleton pregnancies by 24 to 48 hours. The efficacy of oral betamimetics in women with a twin pregnancy is unproven.

OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of prophylactic oral betamimetics for the prevention of preterm labour and birth for women with twin pregnancies.

SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group Trials Register (21 September 2015), MEDLINE (January 1966 to 31 July 2015), EMBASE (January 1985 to 31 July 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies.

SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials in twin pregnancies comparing oral betamimetics with placebo or any intervention with the specific aim of preventing preterm birth. Quasi-randomised controlled trials, cluster-randomised trials and cross-over trials were not eligible for inclusion.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. Two authors assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach.

MAIN RESULTS: Overall, the quality of evidence is low for the primary outcomes. All of the included trials had small numbers of participants and few events. Preterm birth, the most important primary outcome, had wide confidence intervals crossing the line of no effect.Six trials (374 twin pregnancies) were included, but only five trials (344 twin pregnancies) contributed data. All trials compared oral betamimetics with placebo.Betamimetics reduced the incidence of preterm labour (two trials, 194 twin pregnancies, risk ratio (RR) 0.37; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.17 to 0.78; low quality evidence). However, betamimetics did not reduce prelabour rupture of membranes (one trial, 144 twin pregnancies, RR 1.42; 95% CI 0.42 to 4.82; low quality evidence), preterm birth less than 37 weeks' gestation (four trials, 276 twin pregnancies, RR 0.85; 95% CI 0.65 to 1.10; low quality evidence), or less than 34 weeks' gestation (one trial, 144 twin pregnancies, RR 0.47; 95% CI 0.15 to 1.50; low quality evidence). Mean neonatal birthweight in the betamimetic group was significantly higher than in the placebo group (three trials, 478 neonates, mean difference 111.22 g; 95% CI 22.21 to 200.24). Nevertheless, there was no evidence of an effect of betamimetics in reduction of low birthweight (two trials, 366 neonates, average RR 1.19; 95% CI 0.77 to 1.85, random-effects), or small-for-gestational age neonates (two trials, 178 neonates, average RR 0.90; 95% CI 0.41 to 1.99, random-effects). Two trials showed that betamimetics significantly reduced the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome (388 neonates, RR 0.30; 95% CI 0.12 to 0.77), but the difference was not significant when the analysis was adjusted to account for the non-independence of twins (194 twins, RR 0.35; 95% CI 0.11 to 1.16). Three trials showed no evidence of an effect of betamimetics in reducing neonatal mortality, either with the unadjusted analysis, assuming twins are completely independent of each other (452 neonates, average RR 0.90; 95% CI 0.15 to 5.37, random-effects), or in the adjusted analysis, assuming non-independence of twins (226 twins, average RR 0.74; 95% CI 0.23 to 2.38, random-effects). A maternal death was reported in one trial without a significant difference between the groups (144 women, RR 2.84; 95% CI 0.12 to 68.57).

AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of prophylactic oral betamimetics for preventing preterm birth in women with a twin pregnancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)CD004733
JournalThe Cochrane database of systematic reviews
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Adrenergic beta-Agonists
Twin Pregnancy
Premature Birth
Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
Newborn Infant
Pregnancy
Premature Obstetric Labor
Placebos
Infant Mortality
Randomized Controlled Trials
Maternal Death
Incidence
MEDLINE
Cross-Over Studies
Gestational Age
Rupture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Prophylactic oral betamimetics for reducing preterm birth in women with a twin pregnancy. / Yamasmit, Waralak; Chaithongwongwatthana, Surasith; Tolosa, Jorge; Limpongsanurak, Sompop; Pereira, Leonardo; Lumbiganon, Pisake.

In: The Cochrane database of systematic reviews, Vol. 12, 2015, p. CD004733.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yamasmit, Waralak ; Chaithongwongwatthana, Surasith ; Tolosa, Jorge ; Limpongsanurak, Sompop ; Pereira, Leonardo ; Lumbiganon, Pisake. / Prophylactic oral betamimetics for reducing preterm birth in women with a twin pregnancy. In: The Cochrane database of systematic reviews. 2015 ; Vol. 12. pp. CD004733.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Twin pregnancies are associated with a high risk of neonatal mortality and morbidity due to an increased rate of preterm birth. Betamimetics can decrease contraction frequency or delay preterm birth in singleton pregnancies by 24 to 48 hours. The efficacy of oral betamimetics in women with a twin pregnancy is unproven.OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of prophylactic oral betamimetics for the prevention of preterm labour and birth for women with twin pregnancies.SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group Trials Register (21 September 2015), MEDLINE (January 1966 to 31 July 2015), EMBASE (January 1985 to 31 July 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies.SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials in twin pregnancies comparing oral betamimetics with placebo or any intervention with the specific aim of preventing preterm birth. Quasi-randomised controlled trials, cluster-randomised trials and cross-over trials were not eligible for inclusion.DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. Two authors assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach.MAIN RESULTS: Overall, the quality of evidence is low for the primary outcomes. All of the included trials had small numbers of participants and few events. Preterm birth, the most important primary outcome, had wide confidence intervals crossing the line of no effect.Six trials (374 twin pregnancies) were included, but only five trials (344 twin pregnancies) contributed data. All trials compared oral betamimetics with placebo.Betamimetics reduced the incidence of preterm labour (two trials, 194 twin pregnancies, risk ratio (RR) 0.37; 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 0.17 to 0.78; low quality evidence). However, betamimetics did not reduce prelabour rupture of membranes (one trial, 144 twin pregnancies, RR 1.42; 95{\%} CI 0.42 to 4.82; low quality evidence), preterm birth less than 37 weeks' gestation (four trials, 276 twin pregnancies, RR 0.85; 95{\%} CI 0.65 to 1.10; low quality evidence), or less than 34 weeks' gestation (one trial, 144 twin pregnancies, RR 0.47; 95{\%} CI 0.15 to 1.50; low quality evidence). Mean neonatal birthweight in the betamimetic group was significantly higher than in the placebo group (three trials, 478 neonates, mean difference 111.22 g; 95{\%} CI 22.21 to 200.24). Nevertheless, there was no evidence of an effect of betamimetics in reduction of low birthweight (two trials, 366 neonates, average RR 1.19; 95{\%} CI 0.77 to 1.85, random-effects), or small-for-gestational age neonates (two trials, 178 neonates, average RR 0.90; 95{\%} CI 0.41 to 1.99, random-effects). Two trials showed that betamimetics significantly reduced the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome (388 neonates, RR 0.30; 95{\%} CI 0.12 to 0.77), but the difference was not significant when the analysis was adjusted to account for the non-independence of twins (194 twins, RR 0.35; 95{\%} CI 0.11 to 1.16). Three trials showed no evidence of an effect of betamimetics in reducing neonatal mortality, either with the unadjusted analysis, assuming twins are completely independent of each other (452 neonates, average RR 0.90; 95{\%} CI 0.15 to 5.37, random-effects), or in the adjusted analysis, assuming non-independence of twins (226 twins, average RR 0.74; 95{\%} CI 0.23 to 2.38, random-effects). A maternal death was reported in one trial without a significant difference between the groups (144 women, RR 2.84; 95{\%} CI 0.12 to 68.57).AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of prophylactic oral betamimetics for preventing preterm birth in women with a twin pregnancy.",
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T1 - Prophylactic oral betamimetics for reducing preterm birth in women with a twin pregnancy

AU - Yamasmit, Waralak

AU - Chaithongwongwatthana, Surasith

AU - Tolosa, Jorge

AU - Limpongsanurak, Sompop

AU - Pereira, Leonardo

AU - Lumbiganon, Pisake

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - BACKGROUND: Twin pregnancies are associated with a high risk of neonatal mortality and morbidity due to an increased rate of preterm birth. Betamimetics can decrease contraction frequency or delay preterm birth in singleton pregnancies by 24 to 48 hours. The efficacy of oral betamimetics in women with a twin pregnancy is unproven.OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of prophylactic oral betamimetics for the prevention of preterm labour and birth for women with twin pregnancies.SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group Trials Register (21 September 2015), MEDLINE (January 1966 to 31 July 2015), EMBASE (January 1985 to 31 July 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies.SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials in twin pregnancies comparing oral betamimetics with placebo or any intervention with the specific aim of preventing preterm birth. Quasi-randomised controlled trials, cluster-randomised trials and cross-over trials were not eligible for inclusion.DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. Two authors assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach.MAIN RESULTS: Overall, the quality of evidence is low for the primary outcomes. All of the included trials had small numbers of participants and few events. Preterm birth, the most important primary outcome, had wide confidence intervals crossing the line of no effect.Six trials (374 twin pregnancies) were included, but only five trials (344 twin pregnancies) contributed data. All trials compared oral betamimetics with placebo.Betamimetics reduced the incidence of preterm labour (two trials, 194 twin pregnancies, risk ratio (RR) 0.37; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.17 to 0.78; low quality evidence). However, betamimetics did not reduce prelabour rupture of membranes (one trial, 144 twin pregnancies, RR 1.42; 95% CI 0.42 to 4.82; low quality evidence), preterm birth less than 37 weeks' gestation (four trials, 276 twin pregnancies, RR 0.85; 95% CI 0.65 to 1.10; low quality evidence), or less than 34 weeks' gestation (one trial, 144 twin pregnancies, RR 0.47; 95% CI 0.15 to 1.50; low quality evidence). Mean neonatal birthweight in the betamimetic group was significantly higher than in the placebo group (three trials, 478 neonates, mean difference 111.22 g; 95% CI 22.21 to 200.24). Nevertheless, there was no evidence of an effect of betamimetics in reduction of low birthweight (two trials, 366 neonates, average RR 1.19; 95% CI 0.77 to 1.85, random-effects), or small-for-gestational age neonates (two trials, 178 neonates, average RR 0.90; 95% CI 0.41 to 1.99, random-effects). Two trials showed that betamimetics significantly reduced the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome (388 neonates, RR 0.30; 95% CI 0.12 to 0.77), but the difference was not significant when the analysis was adjusted to account for the non-independence of twins (194 twins, RR 0.35; 95% CI 0.11 to 1.16). Three trials showed no evidence of an effect of betamimetics in reducing neonatal mortality, either with the unadjusted analysis, assuming twins are completely independent of each other (452 neonates, average RR 0.90; 95% CI 0.15 to 5.37, random-effects), or in the adjusted analysis, assuming non-independence of twins (226 twins, average RR 0.74; 95% CI 0.23 to 2.38, random-effects). A maternal death was reported in one trial without a significant difference between the groups (144 women, RR 2.84; 95% CI 0.12 to 68.57).AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of prophylactic oral betamimetics for preventing preterm birth in women with a twin pregnancy.

AB - BACKGROUND: Twin pregnancies are associated with a high risk of neonatal mortality and morbidity due to an increased rate of preterm birth. Betamimetics can decrease contraction frequency or delay preterm birth in singleton pregnancies by 24 to 48 hours. The efficacy of oral betamimetics in women with a twin pregnancy is unproven.OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of prophylactic oral betamimetics for the prevention of preterm labour and birth for women with twin pregnancies.SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group Trials Register (21 September 2015), MEDLINE (January 1966 to 31 July 2015), EMBASE (January 1985 to 31 July 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies.SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials in twin pregnancies comparing oral betamimetics with placebo or any intervention with the specific aim of preventing preterm birth. Quasi-randomised controlled trials, cluster-randomised trials and cross-over trials were not eligible for inclusion.DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. Two authors assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach.MAIN RESULTS: Overall, the quality of evidence is low for the primary outcomes. All of the included trials had small numbers of participants and few events. Preterm birth, the most important primary outcome, had wide confidence intervals crossing the line of no effect.Six trials (374 twin pregnancies) were included, but only five trials (344 twin pregnancies) contributed data. All trials compared oral betamimetics with placebo.Betamimetics reduced the incidence of preterm labour (two trials, 194 twin pregnancies, risk ratio (RR) 0.37; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.17 to 0.78; low quality evidence). However, betamimetics did not reduce prelabour rupture of membranes (one trial, 144 twin pregnancies, RR 1.42; 95% CI 0.42 to 4.82; low quality evidence), preterm birth less than 37 weeks' gestation (four trials, 276 twin pregnancies, RR 0.85; 95% CI 0.65 to 1.10; low quality evidence), or less than 34 weeks' gestation (one trial, 144 twin pregnancies, RR 0.47; 95% CI 0.15 to 1.50; low quality evidence). Mean neonatal birthweight in the betamimetic group was significantly higher than in the placebo group (three trials, 478 neonates, mean difference 111.22 g; 95% CI 22.21 to 200.24). Nevertheless, there was no evidence of an effect of betamimetics in reduction of low birthweight (two trials, 366 neonates, average RR 1.19; 95% CI 0.77 to 1.85, random-effects), or small-for-gestational age neonates (two trials, 178 neonates, average RR 0.90; 95% CI 0.41 to 1.99, random-effects). Two trials showed that betamimetics significantly reduced the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome (388 neonates, RR 0.30; 95% CI 0.12 to 0.77), but the difference was not significant when the analysis was adjusted to account for the non-independence of twins (194 twins, RR 0.35; 95% CI 0.11 to 1.16). Three trials showed no evidence of an effect of betamimetics in reducing neonatal mortality, either with the unadjusted analysis, assuming twins are completely independent of each other (452 neonates, average RR 0.90; 95% CI 0.15 to 5.37, random-effects), or in the adjusted analysis, assuming non-independence of twins (226 twins, average RR 0.74; 95% CI 0.23 to 2.38, random-effects). A maternal death was reported in one trial without a significant difference between the groups (144 women, RR 2.84; 95% CI 0.12 to 68.57).AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of prophylactic oral betamimetics for preventing preterm birth in women with a twin pregnancy.

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