Prolonged adherence of human immunodeficiency virus-derived vector particles to hematopoietic target cells leads to secondary transduction in vitro and in vivo

Yung Wei Pan, Jarrad M. Scarlett, Tammy T. Luoh, Peter Kurre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus type 1-derived lentivirus vectors bearing the vesicular stomatitis virus G (VSV-G) envelope glycoprotein demonstrate a wide host range and can stably transduce quiescent hematopoietic stem cells. In light of concerns about biosafety and potential germ line transmission, they have been used predominantly for ex vivo strategies, thought to ensure the removal of escess surface-bound particles and prevent in vivo dissemination. Studies presented here instead reveal prolonged particle adherence after ex vivo exposure, despite serial wash procedures, with subsequent transduction of secondary target cells in direct and transwell cocultures. We explored the critical parameters affecting particle retention and transfer and show that attachment to the cell surface selectively protects virus particles from serum complement-mediated inactivation. Moreover, studies with nonmyeloablated murine recipients show that transplantation of vector-exposed, washed hematopoietic cells results in systemic dissemination of functional VSV-G/lentivector particles. We demonstrate genetic marking by inadvertent transfer of vector particles and prolonged expression of transgene product in recipient tissues. Our findings have implications for biosafety, vector design, and cell biology research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)639-649
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of virology
Volume81
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

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