Progression of atherosclerosis in arteries distal to lower extremity revascularizations

Robert Mclafferty, Gregory (Greg) Moneta, Philippe A. Masser, Lloyd M. Taylor, John M. Porter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The characteristics of progression of atherosclerotic occlusive disease (AOD) of the lower extremities after revascularization are unknown. Duplex scanning or angiography were used to determine progression in 150 patients after they underwent revascularization for AOD. Methods: Follow-up studies were compared with presurgical arteriograms. Superficial femoral (SFA) and popliteal arteries were graded as less than 50% stenosis, 50% to 99% stenosis, or occluded. Tibial arteries were graded with regard to whether they were continuously patent from the popliteal trifurcation to the ankle. Progression was defined as an increase in one stenosis category. Results: At a mean follow-up of 4.8 years, 18% of native arteries, 39% of extremities, and 52% of patients demonstrated progression of AOD. Overall, 21% of arteries in patients undergoing infrainguinal bypass and 14% of arteries in patients undergoing suprainguinal bypass demonstrated progression (p = 0.004). Progression was more frequently detected in examinations performed more than 4 years after baseline arteriography (66%) than in examinations performed 6 months to 2 years (45%, p = 0.032) or 2 to 4 years (44%, p = 0.029) after baseline arteriography. Thirty percent of SFAs demonstrated progression, and 32% with 50% stenosis or greater at baseline became occluded. There was no difference in SFA, popliteal, or tibial artery progression in revascularized versus nonrevascularized extremities after suprainguinal bypass. There was no difference in tibial artery progression in operated and nonoperated limbs after femoropopliteal artery bypass. Conclusions: AOD progression occurs frequently in patients requiring revascularization and is more prevalent in patients requiring femoropopliteal than in patients requiring suprainguinal bypass. AOD progression in patients undergoing vascular surgery is associated with the pattern of disease producing lower extremity ischemia and does not appear to be worsened by arterial reconstruction. (J VASC SURG 1995;22:450-6.).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)450-456
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lower Extremity
Atherosclerosis
Arteries
Tibial Arteries
Pathologic Constriction
Popliteal Artery
Angiography
Extremities
Femoral Artery
Disease Progression
Ankle
Blood Vessels
Ischemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Progression of atherosclerosis in arteries distal to lower extremity revascularizations. / Mclafferty, Robert; Moneta, Gregory (Greg); Masser, Philippe A.; Taylor, Lloyd M.; Porter, John M.

In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 22, No. 4, 1995, p. 450-456.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mclafferty, Robert ; Moneta, Gregory (Greg) ; Masser, Philippe A. ; Taylor, Lloyd M. ; Porter, John M. / Progression of atherosclerosis in arteries distal to lower extremity revascularizations. In: Journal of Vascular Surgery. 1995 ; Vol. 22, No. 4. pp. 450-456.
@article{fa65f1f0ed504cf2855e03b64ae3c73b,
title = "Progression of atherosclerosis in arteries distal to lower extremity revascularizations",
abstract = "Purpose: The characteristics of progression of atherosclerotic occlusive disease (AOD) of the lower extremities after revascularization are unknown. Duplex scanning or angiography were used to determine progression in 150 patients after they underwent revascularization for AOD. Methods: Follow-up studies were compared with presurgical arteriograms. Superficial femoral (SFA) and popliteal arteries were graded as less than 50{\%} stenosis, 50{\%} to 99{\%} stenosis, or occluded. Tibial arteries were graded with regard to whether they were continuously patent from the popliteal trifurcation to the ankle. Progression was defined as an increase in one stenosis category. Results: At a mean follow-up of 4.8 years, 18{\%} of native arteries, 39{\%} of extremities, and 52{\%} of patients demonstrated progression of AOD. Overall, 21{\%} of arteries in patients undergoing infrainguinal bypass and 14{\%} of arteries in patients undergoing suprainguinal bypass demonstrated progression (p = 0.004). Progression was more frequently detected in examinations performed more than 4 years after baseline arteriography (66{\%}) than in examinations performed 6 months to 2 years (45{\%}, p = 0.032) or 2 to 4 years (44{\%}, p = 0.029) after baseline arteriography. Thirty percent of SFAs demonstrated progression, and 32{\%} with 50{\%} stenosis or greater at baseline became occluded. There was no difference in SFA, popliteal, or tibial artery progression in revascularized versus nonrevascularized extremities after suprainguinal bypass. There was no difference in tibial artery progression in operated and nonoperated limbs after femoropopliteal artery bypass. Conclusions: AOD progression occurs frequently in patients requiring revascularization and is more prevalent in patients requiring femoropopliteal than in patients requiring suprainguinal bypass. AOD progression in patients undergoing vascular surgery is associated with the pattern of disease producing lower extremity ischemia and does not appear to be worsened by arterial reconstruction. (J VASC SURG 1995;22:450-6.).",
author = "Robert Mclafferty and Moneta, {Gregory (Greg)} and Masser, {Philippe A.} and Taylor, {Lloyd M.} and Porter, {John M.}",
year = "1995",
doi = "10.1016/S0741-5214(95)70014-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "450--456",
journal = "Journal of Vascular Surgery",
issn = "0741-5214",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Progression of atherosclerosis in arteries distal to lower extremity revascularizations

AU - Mclafferty, Robert

AU - Moneta, Gregory (Greg)

AU - Masser, Philippe A.

AU - Taylor, Lloyd M.

AU - Porter, John M.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - Purpose: The characteristics of progression of atherosclerotic occlusive disease (AOD) of the lower extremities after revascularization are unknown. Duplex scanning or angiography were used to determine progression in 150 patients after they underwent revascularization for AOD. Methods: Follow-up studies were compared with presurgical arteriograms. Superficial femoral (SFA) and popliteal arteries were graded as less than 50% stenosis, 50% to 99% stenosis, or occluded. Tibial arteries were graded with regard to whether they were continuously patent from the popliteal trifurcation to the ankle. Progression was defined as an increase in one stenosis category. Results: At a mean follow-up of 4.8 years, 18% of native arteries, 39% of extremities, and 52% of patients demonstrated progression of AOD. Overall, 21% of arteries in patients undergoing infrainguinal bypass and 14% of arteries in patients undergoing suprainguinal bypass demonstrated progression (p = 0.004). Progression was more frequently detected in examinations performed more than 4 years after baseline arteriography (66%) than in examinations performed 6 months to 2 years (45%, p = 0.032) or 2 to 4 years (44%, p = 0.029) after baseline arteriography. Thirty percent of SFAs demonstrated progression, and 32% with 50% stenosis or greater at baseline became occluded. There was no difference in SFA, popliteal, or tibial artery progression in revascularized versus nonrevascularized extremities after suprainguinal bypass. There was no difference in tibial artery progression in operated and nonoperated limbs after femoropopliteal artery bypass. Conclusions: AOD progression occurs frequently in patients requiring revascularization and is more prevalent in patients requiring femoropopliteal than in patients requiring suprainguinal bypass. AOD progression in patients undergoing vascular surgery is associated with the pattern of disease producing lower extremity ischemia and does not appear to be worsened by arterial reconstruction. (J VASC SURG 1995;22:450-6.).

AB - Purpose: The characteristics of progression of atherosclerotic occlusive disease (AOD) of the lower extremities after revascularization are unknown. Duplex scanning or angiography were used to determine progression in 150 patients after they underwent revascularization for AOD. Methods: Follow-up studies were compared with presurgical arteriograms. Superficial femoral (SFA) and popliteal arteries were graded as less than 50% stenosis, 50% to 99% stenosis, or occluded. Tibial arteries were graded with regard to whether they were continuously patent from the popliteal trifurcation to the ankle. Progression was defined as an increase in one stenosis category. Results: At a mean follow-up of 4.8 years, 18% of native arteries, 39% of extremities, and 52% of patients demonstrated progression of AOD. Overall, 21% of arteries in patients undergoing infrainguinal bypass and 14% of arteries in patients undergoing suprainguinal bypass demonstrated progression (p = 0.004). Progression was more frequently detected in examinations performed more than 4 years after baseline arteriography (66%) than in examinations performed 6 months to 2 years (45%, p = 0.032) or 2 to 4 years (44%, p = 0.029) after baseline arteriography. Thirty percent of SFAs demonstrated progression, and 32% with 50% stenosis or greater at baseline became occluded. There was no difference in SFA, popliteal, or tibial artery progression in revascularized versus nonrevascularized extremities after suprainguinal bypass. There was no difference in tibial artery progression in operated and nonoperated limbs after femoropopliteal artery bypass. Conclusions: AOD progression occurs frequently in patients requiring revascularization and is more prevalent in patients requiring femoropopliteal than in patients requiring suprainguinal bypass. AOD progression in patients undergoing vascular surgery is associated with the pattern of disease producing lower extremity ischemia and does not appear to be worsened by arterial reconstruction. (J VASC SURG 1995;22:450-6.).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028824879&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028824879&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0741-5214(95)70014-5

DO - 10.1016/S0741-5214(95)70014-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 7563406

AN - SCOPUS:0028824879

VL - 22

SP - 450

EP - 456

JO - Journal of Vascular Surgery

JF - Journal of Vascular Surgery

SN - 0741-5214

IS - 4

ER -