Productivity enhancement for primary care providers using multicondition care management

David Dorr, Adam Wilcox, Kenneth (John) McConnell, Laurie Burns, Cherie P. Brunker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the impact of a multicondition care management system on primary care physician efficiency and productivity. Study Design: Retrospective controlled repeated-measures design comparing physician productivity with the proportion of patients in the care management system. Methods: The setting was primary care clinics in Intermountain Healthcare, a large integrated delivery network. The care management system consisted of a trained team with nurses as care managers and specialized information technology. We defined the use of the care management system as a proportion of referrals by the physician to the care manager. Clinic, physician, and patient panel demographics were used to adjust expected visit productivity and were included in a multivariate mixed model with repeated measures comprising work relative value units and system use. Results: The productivity of 120 physicians in 7 intervention clinics and 14 control clinics was compared during 24 months. Clinic, physician, and patient panel characteristics exhibited similar characteristics, although patients in intervention clinics were less likely to be married. Adjusted work relative value units were 8% (range, 5%-12%) higher for intervention clinics vs control clinics. Additional annual revenue was estimated at $99 986 per clinic. These additional revenues outweighed the estimated cost of the program of $92 077. Conclusions: Physician productivity increased when more than 2% of patients were seen by a care management team; the increased revenue in our market exceeded the cost of the program. Implications for the creation, structure, and reimbursement of such teams are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-28
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Managed Care
Volume13
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2007

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Primary Health Care
productivity
Physicians
physician
management
revenue
Patient Care Management
Costs and Cost Analysis
Primary Care Physicians
specialized information
manager
Referral and Consultation
Retrospective Studies
Nurses
Demography
costs
Technology
Delivery of Health Care
nurse
information technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Productivity enhancement for primary care providers using multicondition care management. / Dorr, David; Wilcox, Adam; McConnell, Kenneth (John); Burns, Laurie; Brunker, Cherie P.

In: American Journal of Managed Care, Vol. 13, No. 1, 01.2007, p. 22-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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