Process of Coping With Radiation Therapy

Jean E. Johnson, Diane R. Lauver, Lillian Nail

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evaluated the ability of self-regulation and emotional-drive theories to explain effects of an informational intervention entailing descriptions of the experience in concrete objective terms on outcomes of coping with radiation therapy (RT) in men (N = 84) with prostate cancer. The experimental group had significantly less disruption in function during and for 3 months following RT than the comparison group. The intervention had no significant effect on negative mood. Consistent with self-regulation theory, similarity between expectations and experience and degree of understanding of the experience mediated the effect of the intervention on function. Emotional-drive theory was not supported. These results are consistent with prior research with surgical patients and support the relevance of the information-processing explanations of self-regulation theory to coping with stressful experiences associated with physical illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)358-364
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Volume57
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Radiotherapy
Aptitude
Automatic Data Processing
Prostatic Neoplasms
Research
Self-Control
Drive

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Johnson, J. E., Lauver, D. R., & Nail, L. (1989). Process of Coping With Radiation Therapy. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 57(3), 358-364.

Process of Coping With Radiation Therapy. / Johnson, Jean E.; Lauver, Diane R.; Nail, Lillian.

In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 57, No. 3, 06.1989, p. 358-364.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Johnson, JE, Lauver, DR & Nail, L 1989, 'Process of Coping With Radiation Therapy', Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 57, no. 3, pp. 358-364.
Johnson JE, Lauver DR, Nail L. Process of Coping With Radiation Therapy. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 1989 Jun;57(3):358-364.
Johnson, Jean E. ; Lauver, Diane R. ; Nail, Lillian. / Process of Coping With Radiation Therapy. In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. 1989 ; Vol. 57, No. 3. pp. 358-364.
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