Prior sleep problems predict internalising problems later in life

Evelyne Touchette, Aude Chollet, Cédric Galéra, Eric Fombonne, Bruno Falissard, Michel Boivin, Maria Melchior

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: One possible risk marker of later internalising symptoms is poor sleep, which is a problem for up to 40% of children. The present study investigated whether prior sleep problems could predict internalising symptoms over a period of 18 years of follow-up. Methods: The study sample included 1503 French young adults from the TEMPO cohort (mean age=28.8±3.6 years) whose parents participate in the GAZEL cohort study. All TEMPO participants previously took part in a study of childrens mental health and behaviour in 1991 (mean age=10.3±3.6 years) and 1999 (mean age=18.8±3.6 years). Sleep problems and internalising symptoms (depression, anxiety, somatic complaints) were assessed three times (1991, 1999, 2009) using the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA) questionnaire. The association between sleep problems in 1991 and trajectories of internalising problems from 1991 to 2009 was tested in a multinomial logistic regression framework, controlling for sex, age, baseline temperament, behavioural problems and stressful life events, as well as family income, and parental history of depression. Results: We identified four trajectories of internalising symptoms: high-persistent (2.5%), high-decreasing (11.4%), low-increasing (11.6%), and low-persistent (74.5%). After controlling for covariates, compared to participants who did not have sleep problems in 1991, those who did were 4.51 times (95% CI=1.54-13.19, P=.006) more likely to have high-persistent internalising symptoms and 3.69 times (95% CI=2.00-6.82, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)166-171
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume143
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 20 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sleep
Depression
Temperament
Health Behavior
Young Adult
Mental Health
Cohort Studies
Anxiety
Parents
Logistic Models
TEMPO

Keywords

  • Depressive and anxiety symptoms
  • Epidemiology
  • Longitudinal study
  • Sleep problems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Touchette, E., Chollet, A., Galéra, C., Fombonne, E., Falissard, B., Boivin, M., & Melchior, M. (2012). Prior sleep problems predict internalising problems later in life. Journal of Affective Disorders, 143(1-3), 166-171. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2012.05.049

Prior sleep problems predict internalising problems later in life. / Touchette, Evelyne; Chollet, Aude; Galéra, Cédric; Fombonne, Eric; Falissard, Bruno; Boivin, Michel; Melchior, Maria.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 143, No. 1-3, 20.12.2012, p. 166-171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Touchette, E, Chollet, A, Galéra, C, Fombonne, E, Falissard, B, Boivin, M & Melchior, M 2012, 'Prior sleep problems predict internalising problems later in life', Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 143, no. 1-3, pp. 166-171. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2012.05.049
Touchette, Evelyne ; Chollet, Aude ; Galéra, Cédric ; Fombonne, Eric ; Falissard, Bruno ; Boivin, Michel ; Melchior, Maria. / Prior sleep problems predict internalising problems later in life. In: Journal of Affective Disorders. 2012 ; Vol. 143, No. 1-3. pp. 166-171.
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