Primary treatment regimen and diabetes insipidus as predictors of health outcomes in adults with childhood-onset craniopharyngioma

Kevin C J Yuen, Maria Kołtowska-Häggström, David M. Cook, Janet L. Fox, Peter J. Jönsson, Mitchell E. Geffner, Roger Abs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Craniopharyngiomas are often associated with significant morbidity due to their location and treatment effects. Little is known of the effects of primary treatment regimen and diabetes insipidus (DI), a clinical surrogate of hypothalamic obesity, on health outcomes in adults with childhood-onset craniopharyngioma (COCP). Objective: The objective of the study was to examine health outcomes of adults with COCP based on primary treatment regimens and the presence of DI. Design: This study included a retrospective KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database) data analysis of 180 adults with COCP according to the primary treatment regimen [one surgery (1Surg) vs complex treatment regimen (CTrR) of more than 1Surg and/or radiotherapy] and the presence of DI. Results: The majority of COCP patients underwent transcranial surgery (77%) without receiving radiotherapy (84%). Compared with the 1Surg group, more CTrR patients developed visual field defects and ophthalmoplegia (all P - .01). Compared with patients without DI, those with DI had higher rates of anterior pituitary hormone deficits, body mass index, and fat mass (all P - .01). By contrast, fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1c, lipid panel, and quality of life were comparable among 1Surg vs CTrR patients, and patients with vs without DI. Regardless of primary treatment received, the presence of DI in either group was associated with higher rates of anterior pituitary hormone deficits and obesity. Conclusion: CTrR and DI predicted health outcomes differently. CTrR predisposed to the development of visual dysfunction, whereas DI was associated with higher rates of anterior pituitary dysfunction and weight gain. Higher body mass index and fat mass in patients with DI further implicate the role of hypothalamic damage as an important causal factor of obesity in these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1227-1235
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume99
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Craniopharyngioma
Diabetes Insipidus
Medical problems
Health
Patient treatment
Anterior Pituitary Hormones
Therapeutics
Obesity
Radiotherapy
Surgery
Body Mass Index
Fats
Ophthalmoplegia
Visual Fields
Weight Gain
Fasting
Hemoglobins
Quality of Life
Databases
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Primary treatment regimen and diabetes insipidus as predictors of health outcomes in adults with childhood-onset craniopharyngioma. / Yuen, Kevin C J; Kołtowska-Häggström, Maria; Cook, David M.; Fox, Janet L.; Jönsson, Peter J.; Geffner, Mitchell E.; Abs, Roger.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 99, No. 4, 2014, p. 1227-1235.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yuen, Kevin C J ; Kołtowska-Häggström, Maria ; Cook, David M. ; Fox, Janet L. ; Jönsson, Peter J. ; Geffner, Mitchell E. ; Abs, Roger. / Primary treatment regimen and diabetes insipidus as predictors of health outcomes in adults with childhood-onset craniopharyngioma. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2014 ; Vol. 99, No. 4. pp. 1227-1235.
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T1 - Primary treatment regimen and diabetes insipidus as predictors of health outcomes in adults with childhood-onset craniopharyngioma

AU - Yuen, Kevin C J

AU - Kołtowska-Häggström, Maria

AU - Cook, David M.

AU - Fox, Janet L.

AU - Jönsson, Peter J.

AU - Geffner, Mitchell E.

AU - Abs, Roger

PY - 2014

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N2 - Context: Craniopharyngiomas are often associated with significant morbidity due to their location and treatment effects. Little is known of the effects of primary treatment regimen and diabetes insipidus (DI), a clinical surrogate of hypothalamic obesity, on health outcomes in adults with childhood-onset craniopharyngioma (COCP). Objective: The objective of the study was to examine health outcomes of adults with COCP based on primary treatment regimens and the presence of DI. Design: This study included a retrospective KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database) data analysis of 180 adults with COCP according to the primary treatment regimen [one surgery (1Surg) vs complex treatment regimen (CTrR) of more than 1Surg and/or radiotherapy] and the presence of DI. Results: The majority of COCP patients underwent transcranial surgery (77%) without receiving radiotherapy (84%). Compared with the 1Surg group, more CTrR patients developed visual field defects and ophthalmoplegia (all P - .01). Compared with patients without DI, those with DI had higher rates of anterior pituitary hormone deficits, body mass index, and fat mass (all P - .01). By contrast, fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1c, lipid panel, and quality of life were comparable among 1Surg vs CTrR patients, and patients with vs without DI. Regardless of primary treatment received, the presence of DI in either group was associated with higher rates of anterior pituitary hormone deficits and obesity. Conclusion: CTrR and DI predicted health outcomes differently. CTrR predisposed to the development of visual dysfunction, whereas DI was associated with higher rates of anterior pituitary dysfunction and weight gain. Higher body mass index and fat mass in patients with DI further implicate the role of hypothalamic damage as an important causal factor of obesity in these patients.

AB - Context: Craniopharyngiomas are often associated with significant morbidity due to their location and treatment effects. Little is known of the effects of primary treatment regimen and diabetes insipidus (DI), a clinical surrogate of hypothalamic obesity, on health outcomes in adults with childhood-onset craniopharyngioma (COCP). Objective: The objective of the study was to examine health outcomes of adults with COCP based on primary treatment regimens and the presence of DI. Design: This study included a retrospective KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database) data analysis of 180 adults with COCP according to the primary treatment regimen [one surgery (1Surg) vs complex treatment regimen (CTrR) of more than 1Surg and/or radiotherapy] and the presence of DI. Results: The majority of COCP patients underwent transcranial surgery (77%) without receiving radiotherapy (84%). Compared with the 1Surg group, more CTrR patients developed visual field defects and ophthalmoplegia (all P - .01). Compared with patients without DI, those with DI had higher rates of anterior pituitary hormone deficits, body mass index, and fat mass (all P - .01). By contrast, fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1c, lipid panel, and quality of life were comparable among 1Surg vs CTrR patients, and patients with vs without DI. Regardless of primary treatment received, the presence of DI in either group was associated with higher rates of anterior pituitary hormone deficits and obesity. Conclusion: CTrR and DI predicted health outcomes differently. CTrR predisposed to the development of visual dysfunction, whereas DI was associated with higher rates of anterior pituitary dysfunction and weight gain. Higher body mass index and fat mass in patients with DI further implicate the role of hypothalamic damage as an important causal factor of obesity in these patients.

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