Prevalence, phenotype and genotype of oral enterococci

Christine Sedgley, S. L. Lennan, D. B. Clewell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the prevalence, phenotype and genotype of oral enterococci. Enterococci were detected in oral rinse samples from 11% of 100 patients receiving endodontic treatment and 1% of 100 dental students with no history of endodontic treatment (P = 0.0027). All enterococcal isolates were identified as Enterococcus faecalis. Viable counts ranged from 1 × 10 to 6 × 103 colony forming units per mL of oral rinse sample. Potential virulence traits expressed by oral E. faecalis strains included production of hemolysin (n = 4) and gelatinase (n = 4), and response to pheromones in E. faecalis culture filtrate (n = 1). Six strains produced bacteriocin. All strains were susceptible to ampicillin, benzylpenicillin, gentamicin and vancomycin. There was no evidence of metal-ion resistance. One isolate produced hemolysin, gelatinase and bacteriocin, was resistant to several antibiotics, and responded to the pheromone cPD1. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and plasmid analysis showed that oral E. faecalis exhibited widespread genetic polymorphism, with plasmids detected in seven strains.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-101
Number of pages7
JournalOral Microbiology and Immunology
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Enterococcus faecalis
Enterococcus
Genotype
Phenotype
Gelatinases
Bacteriocins
Hemolysin Proteins
Pheromones
Endodontics
Plasmids
Dental Students
Penicillin G
Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis
Genetic Polymorphisms
Vancomycin
Ampicillin
Gentamicins
Virulence
Stem Cells
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Genotype
  • Oral enterococci
  • Phenotype
  • Prevalence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Prevalence, phenotype and genotype of oral enterococci. / Sedgley, Christine; Lennan, S. L.; Clewell, D. B.

In: Oral Microbiology and Immunology, Vol. 19, No. 2, 04.2004, p. 95-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sedgley, Christine ; Lennan, S. L. ; Clewell, D. B. / Prevalence, phenotype and genotype of oral enterococci. In: Oral Microbiology and Immunology. 2004 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 95-101.
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