Prevalence of colon polyps detected by colonoscopy screening of asymptomatic Hispanic patients

Brent Lee, Jennifer Holub, Dawn Peters, David Lieberman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Compared with whites, Hispanics have lower incidence of and mortality from colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine whether asymptomatic Hispanics undergoing colonoscopy screening also have lower age-adjusted incidence of polyps ≥10 mm. Such data could be used to formulate future screening guidelines. Aims: The objectives of this study were to measure and analyze the prevalence and location of polyps sized ≥10 mm in asymptomatic white and Hispanic patients who received colonoscopy screening. Methods: Colonoscopy data were prospectively collected from the Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative database, which includes data from a consortium of 66 adult gastrointestinal practice sites in the United States. Asymptomatic white (n = 146,798) and Hispanic (n = 7,654) patients who received colonoscopy screening from 2004 to 2007 were identified. The prevalence of any polyps ≥10 mm and of proximal polyps ≥10 mm was adjusted for age, sex, practice site type, and family history of colorectal cancer in a multivariate analysis. Results: There was no significant difference between prevalence of polyps ≥10 mm in Hispanic and white patients (5.8% vs. 6.2%; P = 0.11; adjusted OR 0.94; 95% CI 0.85-1.03). There was also no significant difference between prevalence of proximal polyps ≥10 mm in Hispanics and whites (adjusted OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.87-1.27). Conclusion: Despite lower incidence of colorectal cancer, the risk of polyps ≥10 mm for Hispanic patients undergoing colonoscopy screening is similar to that for whites. These data emphasize the importance of encouraging timely colorectal cancer screening in Hispanics. Our findings support the application of similar recommendations for colorectal cancer screening of Hispanics and whites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)481-488
Number of pages8
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2012

Fingerprint

Colonoscopy
Polyps
Hispanic Americans
Colon
Colorectal Neoplasms
Early Detection of Cancer
Incidence
Family Practice
Multivariate Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Databases
Guidelines
Mortality

Keywords

  • Colon polyps
  • Colonoscopy
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Hispanic
  • Screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Physiology

Cite this

Prevalence of colon polyps detected by colonoscopy screening of asymptomatic Hispanic patients. / Lee, Brent; Holub, Jennifer; Peters, Dawn; Lieberman, David.

In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, Vol. 57, No. 2, 02.2012, p. 481-488.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Compared with whites, Hispanics have lower incidence of and mortality from colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine whether asymptomatic Hispanics undergoing colonoscopy screening also have lower age-adjusted incidence of polyps ≥10 mm. Such data could be used to formulate future screening guidelines. Aims: The objectives of this study were to measure and analyze the prevalence and location of polyps sized ≥10 mm in asymptomatic white and Hispanic patients who received colonoscopy screening. Methods: Colonoscopy data were prospectively collected from the Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative database, which includes data from a consortium of 66 adult gastrointestinal practice sites in the United States. Asymptomatic white (n = 146,798) and Hispanic (n = 7,654) patients who received colonoscopy screening from 2004 to 2007 were identified. The prevalence of any polyps ≥10 mm and of proximal polyps ≥10 mm was adjusted for age, sex, practice site type, and family history of colorectal cancer in a multivariate analysis. Results: There was no significant difference between prevalence of polyps ≥10 mm in Hispanic and white patients (5.8{\%} vs. 6.2{\%}; P = 0.11; adjusted OR 0.94; 95{\%} CI 0.85-1.03). There was also no significant difference between prevalence of proximal polyps ≥10 mm in Hispanics and whites (adjusted OR 1.05; 95{\%} CI 0.87-1.27). Conclusion: Despite lower incidence of colorectal cancer, the risk of polyps ≥10 mm for Hispanic patients undergoing colonoscopy screening is similar to that for whites. These data emphasize the importance of encouraging timely colorectal cancer screening in Hispanics. Our findings support the application of similar recommendations for colorectal cancer screening of Hispanics and whites.",
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AB - Background: Compared with whites, Hispanics have lower incidence of and mortality from colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine whether asymptomatic Hispanics undergoing colonoscopy screening also have lower age-adjusted incidence of polyps ≥10 mm. Such data could be used to formulate future screening guidelines. Aims: The objectives of this study were to measure and analyze the prevalence and location of polyps sized ≥10 mm in asymptomatic white and Hispanic patients who received colonoscopy screening. Methods: Colonoscopy data were prospectively collected from the Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative database, which includes data from a consortium of 66 adult gastrointestinal practice sites in the United States. Asymptomatic white (n = 146,798) and Hispanic (n = 7,654) patients who received colonoscopy screening from 2004 to 2007 were identified. The prevalence of any polyps ≥10 mm and of proximal polyps ≥10 mm was adjusted for age, sex, practice site type, and family history of colorectal cancer in a multivariate analysis. Results: There was no significant difference between prevalence of polyps ≥10 mm in Hispanic and white patients (5.8% vs. 6.2%; P = 0.11; adjusted OR 0.94; 95% CI 0.85-1.03). There was also no significant difference between prevalence of proximal polyps ≥10 mm in Hispanics and whites (adjusted OR 1.05; 95% CI 0.87-1.27). Conclusion: Despite lower incidence of colorectal cancer, the risk of polyps ≥10 mm for Hispanic patients undergoing colonoscopy screening is similar to that for whites. These data emphasize the importance of encouraging timely colorectal cancer screening in Hispanics. Our findings support the application of similar recommendations for colorectal cancer screening of Hispanics and whites.

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