Pressure sores

Thomas (Tom) Cooney, J. B. Reuler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pressure sores are a common problem and have a major effect on patient morbidity, mortality, rehabilitation and health care expenditures. A general lack of knowledge or interest in this problem has fostered inadequate preventive care and poor understanding of treatment. Pressure sores occur most frequently in two populations: patients with spinal cord injuries and elderly patients. Pressure sores develop in 25% to 85% of all patients with spinal cord injuries and resulting complications account for 7% to 8% of deaths in this group. Surveys of general hospitals have shown that pressure sores develop in 3% to 4.5% of patients during their hospital stay. The prevalence of pressure ulceration increases greatly with age, with patients older than 70 years of age accounting for 70% of all those afflicted. In this age group, 70% of all pressure sores develop within two weeks of admission to hospital.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)622-624
Number of pages3
JournalWestern Journal of Medicine
Volume140
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1984

Fingerprint

Pressure Ulcer
Spinal Cord Injuries
Preventive Medicine
Health Expenditures
General Hospitals
Length of Stay
Rehabilitation
Age Groups
Morbidity
Delivery of Health Care
Pressure
Mortality
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cooney, T. T., & Reuler, J. B. (1984). Pressure sores. Western Journal of Medicine, 140(4), 622-624.

Pressure sores. / Cooney, Thomas (Tom); Reuler, J. B.

In: Western Journal of Medicine, Vol. 140, No. 4, 1984, p. 622-624.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cooney, TT & Reuler, JB 1984, 'Pressure sores', Western Journal of Medicine, vol. 140, no. 4, pp. 622-624.
Cooney TT, Reuler JB. Pressure sores. Western Journal of Medicine. 1984;140(4):622-624.
Cooney, Thomas (Tom) ; Reuler, J. B. / Pressure sores. In: Western Journal of Medicine. 1984 ; Vol. 140, No. 4. pp. 622-624.
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