Preservation of the myocardium by means of cold physiological solutions, as assessed by ventricular function, histochemistry and birefringence

A. Hedley Brown, Nelson (Sam) Niles, Mark V. Braimbridge, W. Gerald Austen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The efficacy of myocardial preservation by means of cold, oxygenated Hartmann's, Bretschneider's, Eagle's Minimum Electrolyte Medium, and micro- or coarsely filtered Krebs' solution has been compared with that afforded by cold alone and by cross-perfusion from a healthy animal. The experimental preparation was an isolated heart free of inherent deterioration over the experimental period of 3 hr when crossperfused. Assessment was by isovolumic ventricular function tests and histological, histochemical and birefringence examination of drill biopsies. No means of cold, in vitro preservation of the heart permitted it to retain its mechanical performance as well as did normothermic cross-perfusion from a healthy animal, but all cold, oxygenated physiological solutions infused into the coronary arteries performed better than cold alone. Although few statistical differences were shown among the solutions, microfiltered modified Krebs' solution and modified Eagle's Minimum Electrolyte Medium were consistently more effective. Histochemical and birefringence behavior of the myocardium was disappointing in predicting mechanical performance of the myocardium after cold preservation, presumably because cold permits histochemical appearances to be preserved when function is not. Nevertheless, the groups with the poorest residual function showed the most histological damage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-57
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1973
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Birefringence
Ventricular Function
Myocardium
Eagles
Electrolytes
Perfusion
Mandrillus
Coronary Vessels
Biopsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Preservation of the myocardium by means of cold physiological solutions, as assessed by ventricular function, histochemistry and birefringence. / Brown, A. Hedley; Niles, Nelson (Sam); Braimbridge, Mark V.; Austen, W. Gerald.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 14, No. 1, 1973, p. 46-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, A. Hedley ; Niles, Nelson (Sam) ; Braimbridge, Mark V. ; Austen, W. Gerald. / Preservation of the myocardium by means of cold physiological solutions, as assessed by ventricular function, histochemistry and birefringence. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 1973 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 46-57.
@article{18f7a916d37b4647a5e0a29b8db38a1e,
title = "Preservation of the myocardium by means of cold physiological solutions, as assessed by ventricular function, histochemistry and birefringence",
abstract = "The efficacy of myocardial preservation by means of cold, oxygenated Hartmann's, Bretschneider's, Eagle's Minimum Electrolyte Medium, and micro- or coarsely filtered Krebs' solution has been compared with that afforded by cold alone and by cross-perfusion from a healthy animal. The experimental preparation was an isolated heart free of inherent deterioration over the experimental period of 3 hr when crossperfused. Assessment was by isovolumic ventricular function tests and histological, histochemical and birefringence examination of drill biopsies. No means of cold, in vitro preservation of the heart permitted it to retain its mechanical performance as well as did normothermic cross-perfusion from a healthy animal, but all cold, oxygenated physiological solutions infused into the coronary arteries performed better than cold alone. Although few statistical differences were shown among the solutions, microfiltered modified Krebs' solution and modified Eagle's Minimum Electrolyte Medium were consistently more effective. Histochemical and birefringence behavior of the myocardium was disappointing in predicting mechanical performance of the myocardium after cold preservation, presumably because cold permits histochemical appearances to be preserved when function is not. Nevertheless, the groups with the poorest residual function showed the most histological damage.",
author = "Brown, {A. Hedley} and Niles, {Nelson (Sam)} and Braimbridge, {Mark V.} and Austen, {W. Gerald}",
year = "1973",
doi = "10.1016/0022-4804(73)90009-7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "14",
pages = "46--57",
journal = "Journal of Surgical Research",
issn = "0022-4804",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Preservation of the myocardium by means of cold physiological solutions, as assessed by ventricular function, histochemistry and birefringence

AU - Brown, A. Hedley

AU - Niles, Nelson (Sam)

AU - Braimbridge, Mark V.

AU - Austen, W. Gerald

PY - 1973

Y1 - 1973

N2 - The efficacy of myocardial preservation by means of cold, oxygenated Hartmann's, Bretschneider's, Eagle's Minimum Electrolyte Medium, and micro- or coarsely filtered Krebs' solution has been compared with that afforded by cold alone and by cross-perfusion from a healthy animal. The experimental preparation was an isolated heart free of inherent deterioration over the experimental period of 3 hr when crossperfused. Assessment was by isovolumic ventricular function tests and histological, histochemical and birefringence examination of drill biopsies. No means of cold, in vitro preservation of the heart permitted it to retain its mechanical performance as well as did normothermic cross-perfusion from a healthy animal, but all cold, oxygenated physiological solutions infused into the coronary arteries performed better than cold alone. Although few statistical differences were shown among the solutions, microfiltered modified Krebs' solution and modified Eagle's Minimum Electrolyte Medium were consistently more effective. Histochemical and birefringence behavior of the myocardium was disappointing in predicting mechanical performance of the myocardium after cold preservation, presumably because cold permits histochemical appearances to be preserved when function is not. Nevertheless, the groups with the poorest residual function showed the most histological damage.

AB - The efficacy of myocardial preservation by means of cold, oxygenated Hartmann's, Bretschneider's, Eagle's Minimum Electrolyte Medium, and micro- or coarsely filtered Krebs' solution has been compared with that afforded by cold alone and by cross-perfusion from a healthy animal. The experimental preparation was an isolated heart free of inherent deterioration over the experimental period of 3 hr when crossperfused. Assessment was by isovolumic ventricular function tests and histological, histochemical and birefringence examination of drill biopsies. No means of cold, in vitro preservation of the heart permitted it to retain its mechanical performance as well as did normothermic cross-perfusion from a healthy animal, but all cold, oxygenated physiological solutions infused into the coronary arteries performed better than cold alone. Although few statistical differences were shown among the solutions, microfiltered modified Krebs' solution and modified Eagle's Minimum Electrolyte Medium were consistently more effective. Histochemical and birefringence behavior of the myocardium was disappointing in predicting mechanical performance of the myocardium after cold preservation, presumably because cold permits histochemical appearances to be preserved when function is not. Nevertheless, the groups with the poorest residual function showed the most histological damage.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0015550435&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0015550435&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0022-4804(73)90009-7

DO - 10.1016/0022-4804(73)90009-7

M3 - Article

C2 - 4570921

AN - SCOPUS:0015550435

VL - 14

SP - 46

EP - 57

JO - Journal of Surgical Research

JF - Journal of Surgical Research

SN - 0022-4804

IS - 1

ER -