Prepregnancy body mass index and the length of gestation at term

Naomi E. Stotland, A. Eugene Washington, Aaron Caughey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and length of gestation at term. Study Design: This was a retrospective study of 9336 births at the University of California, San Francisco, at ≥37 weeks' gestation. We performed univariate and multivariable analyses of the associations between prepregnancy BMI and length of gestation (≥40, ≥41, and ≥42 weeks' gestation). Results: Overweight women were more likely to deliver at ≥40, ≥41, and ≥42 weeks' gestation than were women who were underweight or normal weight. In multivariable analyses, higher prepregnancy BMI was associated with higher risk of progressing past 40 weeks. Obese women had 69% higher adjusted odds of reaching 42 weeks' gestation, compared with women of normal prepregnancy BMI (adjusted odds ratio, 1.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-2.31). Conclusion: Higher BMI is associated with prolonged gestation at term. Achieving optimal BMI before conception may reduce the risk of postterm pregnancy and its associated complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume197
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Body Mass Index
Pregnancy
San Francisco
Thinness
Retrospective Studies
Odds Ratio
Parturition
Confidence Intervals
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • obesity
  • postterm pregnancy
  • prepregnancy body mass index

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Prepregnancy body mass index and the length of gestation at term. / Stotland, Naomi E.; Washington, A. Eugene; Caughey, Aaron.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 197, No. 4, 10.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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