Prenatal programming of sexual partner preference

The ram model

Charles Roselli, F. Stormshak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In our laboratory, the domestic ram is used as an experimental model to study the early programming of neural mechanisms underlying same-sex partner preference. This interest developed from the observation that approximately 8% of domestic rams are sexually attracted to other rams (male-oriented) in contrast to the majority of rams that are attracted to oestrous ewes (female-oriented). One prominent feature of sexual differentiation in many species is the presence of a sexually dimorphic nucleus (SDN) in the preoptic/anterior hypothalamus that is larger in males than in females. Lesion studies in rats and ferrets implicate the SDN in the expression of sexual preferences. We discovered an ovine SDN (oSDN) in the preoptic/anterior hypothalamus that is smaller in male- than in female-oriented rams and similar in size to the oSDN of ewes. Neurones of the oSDN show abundant aromatase expression that is also reduced in male-oriented compared to female-oriented rams. This observation suggests that sexual partner preferences are neurologically hard-wired and could be influenced by hormones. Aromatase-containing neurones constitute a nascent oSDN as early as day 60 of gestation, which becomes sexually dimorphic by day 135 of gestation when it is two-fold larger in males than in females. Exposure of fetal female lambs to exogenous testosterone from days 30-90 of gestation resulted in a masculinised oSDN. These data demonstrate that the oSDN develops prenatally and may influence adult sexual preferences. Surprisingly, inhibition of aromatase activity in the brain of ram foetuses during the critical period did not interfere with defeminisation of adult sexual partner preference or oSDN volume. These results fail to support an essential role for neural aromatase in the sexual differentiation of sheep brain and behaviour. Thus, we propose that oSDN morphology and male-typical partner preferences may instead be programmed through an androgen receptor mechanism not involving aromatisation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)359-364
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neuroendocrinology
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Embryonic and Fetal Development
Sexual Partners
Sheep
Aromatase
Anterior Hypothalamus
Sex Differentiation
Preoptic Area
Pregnancy
Neurons
Ferrets
Brain
Androgen Receptors
Testosterone
Fetus
Theoretical Models
Hormones

Keywords

  • Aromatase inhibitor
  • ATD
  • Copulatory behaviour
  • Fertility
  • LH surge
  • Puberty
  • Sexual maturation
  • Sexual partner preference
  • Sheep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Prenatal programming of sexual partner preference : The ram model. / Roselli, Charles; Stormshak, F.

In: Journal of Neuroendocrinology, Vol. 21, No. 4, 2009, p. 359-364.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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