Pregnancy and parenthood in radiation oncology, views and experiences survey (PROVES): Results of a blinded prospective trainee parenting and career development assessment

Emma B. Holliday, Awad A. Ahmed, Reshma Jagsi, Natalie Clark Stentz, Wendy A. Woodward, Clifton D. Fuller, Charles Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose Medical training spans nearly a decade, during which many physicians traditionally begin families. Although childrearing responsibilities are shared by men and women in the modern era, differences in time allocated to child care by sex and its potential impact on residency experience merit discussion. Methods and Materials An anonymous, voluntary, 102-item survey was distributed to 540 current radiation oncology residents and 2014 graduates that asked about marital and parental status, pregnancy during residency, publication productivity, career aspirations, and experiences working with pregnant co-residents. Respondents with children were asked about childcare arrangements, and women who were pregnant during residency were asked about radiation safety, maternity leave, and breastfeeding experiences. Results A total of 190 respondents completed the survey, 107 men (56.3%) and 84 women (43.7%). Ninety-seven respondents (51.1%) were parents, and 84 (44.2%) reported a pregnancy during residency. Respondents with children more often were male (65% vs 47.3%; P=.014), in a higher level of training (79.3% vs 54.8% were PGY4 or higher; P=.001), were older (median age of 32, interquartile range [IQR]:31-35] vs age 30 [IQR: 29-33]; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)516-524
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Volume92
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

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Radiation Oncology
pregnancy
Parenting
students
Internship and Residency
Pregnancy
education
radiation
physicians
productivity
safety
Parental Leave
vacuum
Marital Status
Child Care
Breast Feeding
Publications
Surveys and Questionnaires
Parents
Radiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiation
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Pregnancy and parenthood in radiation oncology, views and experiences survey (PROVES) : Results of a blinded prospective trainee parenting and career development assessment. / Holliday, Emma B.; Ahmed, Awad A.; Jagsi, Reshma; Stentz, Natalie Clark; Woodward, Wendy A.; Fuller, Clifton D.; Thomas, Charles.

In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, Vol. 92, No. 3, 01.07.2015, p. 516-524.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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