Predictors of change in grip strength over 3 years in the African American health project

Douglas K. Miller, Theodore K. Malmstrom, J. Philip Miller, Elena Andresen, Mario Schootman, Fredric D. Wolinsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To examine factors associated with change in grip strength. Method: Grip strength was measured at baseline and 3 years later. Change was divided into decreased ≥5 kg, increased ≥5 kg, and no change and analyzed using multinomial multivariable logistic regression. Results: Decline in grip strength was more likely for men, those reporting having cardiovascular disease, and those with instrumental activities of daily living, lower body functional limitations, high diastolic blood pressure, higher physical activity, and greater body mass. Decline was less likely among those ever having Medicaid, those with basic activities of daily living disabilities, and those unable to see a doctor in past year due to cost. Gain in grip strength was more likely for men and those with instrumental activities of daily living disabilities, lower body functional limitations, high diastolic blood pressure, and higher physical activity; it was less likely for older participants. Discussion: Results can be used to design interventions to improve strength outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-196
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hand Strength
African Americans
Activities of Daily Living
Health
health
Exercise
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
disability
Medicaid
Cardiovascular Diseases
Logistic Models
Costs and Cost Analysis
logistics
American
Disease
regression
costs

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Aging
  • Disablement process
  • Grip strength change over time
  • Sarcopenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Gerontology
  • Community and Home Care

Cite this

Predictors of change in grip strength over 3 years in the African American health project. / Miller, Douglas K.; Malmstrom, Theodore K.; Miller, J. Philip; Andresen, Elena; Schootman, Mario; Wolinsky, Fredric D.

In: Journal of Aging and Health, Vol. 22, No. 2, 03.2010, p. 183-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miller, Douglas K. ; Malmstrom, Theodore K. ; Miller, J. Philip ; Andresen, Elena ; Schootman, Mario ; Wolinsky, Fredric D. / Predictors of change in grip strength over 3 years in the African American health project. In: Journal of Aging and Health. 2010 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 183-196.
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