Prediagnostic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and lung cancer survival in the VITAL study

Theodore M. Brasky, Christina S. Baik, Christopher G. Slatore, Mariela Alvarado, Emily White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Inflammation is important for lung oncogenesis. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been shown to improve colorectal cancer survival. However, few studies have examined the association in lung cancer patients. Methods: The VITamins And Lifestyle (VITAL) cohort includes Washington State residents, aged 50 to 76 years, who completed a baseline questionnaire between 2000 and 2002. Participants responded on the frequency and duration of use of individual NSAIDs in the previous 10 years. Subjects of this study were 785 members of the cohort, who were identified with incident lung cancer from baseline through 2007 through linkage to a population-based cancer registry. Participants were followed for lung cancer death through linkage to state records of death through 2009. Adjusted proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between NSAIDs and lung cancer death. Results: Five hundred and twenty-two participants (66%) died from lung cancer. Relative to nonuse, high (≥4 days/week and ≥4 years) prediagnostic use of regular-strength or low-dose aspirin (HR 0.99, 95% CI: 0.74-1.33 and HR 0.89, 95% CI: 0.67-1.17, respectively) or total nonaspirin NSAIDs (HR 1.20, 95% CI: 0.79-1.83) did not reduce lung cancer death. However, high use of ibuprofen was associated with a 62% increased risk of lung cancer death (HR 1.62, 95% CI: 1.01-2.58). Conclusions: Long-term, prediagnostic NSAID use does not improve lung cancer survival overall. Use of ibuprofen may reduce survival from lung cancer. Our results underscore the need for further study of the mechanisms of action for individual NSAIDs with regard to cancer survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1503-1512
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Thoracic Oncology
Volume7
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012

Fingerprint

Vitamins
Life Style
Lung Neoplasms
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Survival
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Confidence Intervals
Ibuprofen
Death Certificates
Proportional Hazards Models
Aspirin
Registries
Colorectal Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Carcinogenesis
Inflammation
Lung
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Prediagnostic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and lung cancer survival in the VITAL study. / Brasky, Theodore M.; Baik, Christina S.; Slatore, Christopher G.; Alvarado, Mariela; White, Emily.

In: Journal of Thoracic Oncology, Vol. 7, No. 10, 10.2012, p. 1503-1512.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brasky, Theodore M. ; Baik, Christina S. ; Slatore, Christopher G. ; Alvarado, Mariela ; White, Emily. / Prediagnostic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and lung cancer survival in the VITAL study. In: Journal of Thoracic Oncology. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 10. pp. 1503-1512.
@article{2f3b3018e2c4434190c1aca0ce164e0e,
title = "Prediagnostic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and lung cancer survival in the VITAL study",
abstract = "Introduction: Inflammation is important for lung oncogenesis. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been shown to improve colorectal cancer survival. However, few studies have examined the association in lung cancer patients. Methods: The VITamins And Lifestyle (VITAL) cohort includes Washington State residents, aged 50 to 76 years, who completed a baseline questionnaire between 2000 and 2002. Participants responded on the frequency and duration of use of individual NSAIDs in the previous 10 years. Subjects of this study were 785 members of the cohort, who were identified with incident lung cancer from baseline through 2007 through linkage to a population-based cancer registry. Participants were followed for lung cancer death through linkage to state records of death through 2009. Adjusted proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CI) for the association between NSAIDs and lung cancer death. Results: Five hundred and twenty-two participants (66{\%}) died from lung cancer. Relative to nonuse, high (≥4 days/week and ≥4 years) prediagnostic use of regular-strength or low-dose aspirin (HR 0.99, 95{\%} CI: 0.74-1.33 and HR 0.89, 95{\%} CI: 0.67-1.17, respectively) or total nonaspirin NSAIDs (HR 1.20, 95{\%} CI: 0.79-1.83) did not reduce lung cancer death. However, high use of ibuprofen was associated with a 62{\%} increased risk of lung cancer death (HR 1.62, 95{\%} CI: 1.01-2.58). Conclusions: Long-term, prediagnostic NSAID use does not improve lung cancer survival overall. Use of ibuprofen may reduce survival from lung cancer. Our results underscore the need for further study of the mechanisms of action for individual NSAIDs with regard to cancer survival.",
author = "Brasky, {Theodore M.} and Baik, {Christina S.} and Slatore, {Christopher G.} and Mariela Alvarado and Emily White",
year = "2012",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1097/JTO.0b013e3182641bdc",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "7",
pages = "1503--1512",
journal = "Journal of Thoracic Oncology",
issn = "1556-0864",
publisher = "International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prediagnostic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and lung cancer survival in the VITAL study

AU - Brasky, Theodore M.

AU - Baik, Christina S.

AU - Slatore, Christopher G.

AU - Alvarado, Mariela

AU - White, Emily

PY - 2012/10

Y1 - 2012/10

N2 - Introduction: Inflammation is important for lung oncogenesis. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been shown to improve colorectal cancer survival. However, few studies have examined the association in lung cancer patients. Methods: The VITamins And Lifestyle (VITAL) cohort includes Washington State residents, aged 50 to 76 years, who completed a baseline questionnaire between 2000 and 2002. Participants responded on the frequency and duration of use of individual NSAIDs in the previous 10 years. Subjects of this study were 785 members of the cohort, who were identified with incident lung cancer from baseline through 2007 through linkage to a population-based cancer registry. Participants were followed for lung cancer death through linkage to state records of death through 2009. Adjusted proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between NSAIDs and lung cancer death. Results: Five hundred and twenty-two participants (66%) died from lung cancer. Relative to nonuse, high (≥4 days/week and ≥4 years) prediagnostic use of regular-strength or low-dose aspirin (HR 0.99, 95% CI: 0.74-1.33 and HR 0.89, 95% CI: 0.67-1.17, respectively) or total nonaspirin NSAIDs (HR 1.20, 95% CI: 0.79-1.83) did not reduce lung cancer death. However, high use of ibuprofen was associated with a 62% increased risk of lung cancer death (HR 1.62, 95% CI: 1.01-2.58). Conclusions: Long-term, prediagnostic NSAID use does not improve lung cancer survival overall. Use of ibuprofen may reduce survival from lung cancer. Our results underscore the need for further study of the mechanisms of action for individual NSAIDs with regard to cancer survival.

AB - Introduction: Inflammation is important for lung oncogenesis. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has been shown to improve colorectal cancer survival. However, few studies have examined the association in lung cancer patients. Methods: The VITamins And Lifestyle (VITAL) cohort includes Washington State residents, aged 50 to 76 years, who completed a baseline questionnaire between 2000 and 2002. Participants responded on the frequency and duration of use of individual NSAIDs in the previous 10 years. Subjects of this study were 785 members of the cohort, who were identified with incident lung cancer from baseline through 2007 through linkage to a population-based cancer registry. Participants were followed for lung cancer death through linkage to state records of death through 2009. Adjusted proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between NSAIDs and lung cancer death. Results: Five hundred and twenty-two participants (66%) died from lung cancer. Relative to nonuse, high (≥4 days/week and ≥4 years) prediagnostic use of regular-strength or low-dose aspirin (HR 0.99, 95% CI: 0.74-1.33 and HR 0.89, 95% CI: 0.67-1.17, respectively) or total nonaspirin NSAIDs (HR 1.20, 95% CI: 0.79-1.83) did not reduce lung cancer death. However, high use of ibuprofen was associated with a 62% increased risk of lung cancer death (HR 1.62, 95% CI: 1.01-2.58). Conclusions: Long-term, prediagnostic NSAID use does not improve lung cancer survival overall. Use of ibuprofen may reduce survival from lung cancer. Our results underscore the need for further study of the mechanisms of action for individual NSAIDs with regard to cancer survival.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84866627026&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84866627026&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/JTO.0b013e3182641bdc

DO - 10.1097/JTO.0b013e3182641bdc

M3 - Article

C2 - 22982651

AN - SCOPUS:84866627026

VL - 7

SP - 1503

EP - 1512

JO - Journal of Thoracic Oncology

JF - Journal of Thoracic Oncology

SN - 1556-0864

IS - 10

ER -